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Women Across Cultures

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One of the key notions that is announced by Farr, and one of the core reasons that she provides as a legitimation for her work, is the sheer volume overall of both the victims of human trafficking, but also the scope in terms of organized crime — and again, organized crimes that transcend both time and place. Or, organized crime that can be found through history, and through a wide range of major cultures.
The thesis of Farrs book, is that the problem is one that largely stems from economic conditions, and from patriarchal values or the social infrastructure and cultural values that legitimate the subjugation of women. First, concerning the economic conditions underlying the trafficking of women and children, her thesis is rather simple. There is a positive correlation between poverty and trafficking of women and children. In other words, where conditions are so desperate that there are little or no opportunities for women, prostitution is viewed as an alternative. Likewise, as a motivating factor for both organized crime and the complicity of the network of individuals involved in the trade. They are both motivated by their own condition or social conditions, but also are aware that this is a situation which can be easily exploited. This is likewise true for individuals who might sell their children or even kidnap individuals for the purposes of trafficking of women and children. While there is a correlation between poverty and the trafficking of women and children, Farr wants to maintain that this is a causal relationship.
Along with economic conditions that create an environment that is suitable for the trafficking of women and children, Farr argues that there are cultural or social forces that go into constructing that which legitimates the problem. So, while poverty is a sufficient condition for the trafficking of women and children, it is not the only condition. She argues that there are forces that allow for the coercion and subjugation of women that are cultural or social in nature.