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Week 1 Discussion and responses

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Please remember that it is required that 3 postings be made per week on separate occasions to get full credit for the discussions. Also make sure that you do not wait until the end of the week to give everyone a chance to respond.Topic:Reasons to pursue LEEDWhat do you think are some key reasons that an owner would want to seek LEED certification and why?Do you think the up-front costs will yield a return over the life cycle of a building, if so, how?Response 1:Reasons to pursue LEEDWhat do you think are some key reasons that an owner would want to seek LEED certification and why? Do you think the up-front costs will yield a return over the life cycle of a building, if so, how?I think the reasons are pretty obvious of why an owner would want to seek LEED certification: to help the environment. As an owner, you are responsible for your building, and buildings act like living organisms, they require some type of fuel to run properly, and produce waste, and it is in the owner’s hands to make their property one that takes care of the environment, rather than harming it. Since LEED is a third party verification system for Green Buildings, an owner would definitely want to have the LEED certification if they own, or claim to have a Green building. Green buildings take into consideration things like water and energy efficiency, CO2 emission and more. It is true that building Green is more expensive, but in the long run, it will save you money. For example, solar panels are expensive to purchase and install, but in the bigger picture, you end up saving on your energy bill.Source:-What is LEED Certification and Why’s It Important? (2016, June 3). Retrieved from https://bosscontrols.com/leed-certification-important/.Response 2:The financial benefits and helping the environment is the first two things that come to mind when an owner receives their LEED certification, we also have to think of hiring. People would rather work in a healthy environment and breathe clean air. “LEED buildings have faster lease-up rates, may qualify for a host of incentives like tax rebates and zoning allowances, and retain higher property values. Homeowners can often receive tax credits for building LEED-certified homes. LEED-certified homes may lower their insurance premiums and their home values may be more likely to increase over time compared to similiar, non-LEED-certified homes in the same area” (Burger, R). The up-front cost may be a bit more when building a home or commercial building to get LEED-certified but the return on your dollar is well worth it. The lower insurance premiums, the tax rebates, and the resale value will yield a return over the life cycle of the building. An owner can ask these questions before designing a commercial building or a home.ReferenceBurger, R. (August 9, 2019). What are the benefits of LEED-Certification? retrieved from http://www.thebalancesmb.comResponse 3:I wish everyone would build using the LEED program because it is the right thing for the environment. Since not everyone will do it for that reason, here are a few other reasons. Depending on the city, state, or county, they offer tax incentives (greenerideal.com). A LEED-certified building can cost 2 – 6 percent more to build per square foot (Dunbar, Ellen, Mapp, Nobe). However, over the life cycle of the building, you can save 12.2 – 16.8 percent (greenerideal.com). LEED-certified buildings have a higher lease rate, a higher resale value, and healthier indoor space (usgbc.org). A LEED-certified building also has lower energy usage, and water usage, which helps reduce cost and its effect on the environment (usgbc.org). I think building LEED-certified projects makes sense; the overall impact on our environment during construction and the life of the building are worth it.20/12/201915english