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Toward a Praxis Theory of Suffering by Janice Morse

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DISCUSSION AND REPLY TO A DISCUSSION( 4th year Nursing Part one One of the most significant articles that deal with the behavioral-experiential nature of suffering has been Toward a Praxis Theory of Suffering (2001) by Janice Morse which revises and summarizes the major findings from a research program exploring the topic. Nurses are confronted with several cases of suffering in their nursing practice today, and this article has a major function in teaching the nurses the various aspects of suffering. I gathered many vital elements of suffering from this article and I recognized why it is important for nurses to be aware of the behavioral-experiential nature of suffering. According to the author, there are two major behavioral states such as enduring (in which emotions are suppressed. it is manifested as an emotionless state) and emotional suffering (an overt state of distress in which emotions are released). Every individual who are suffering move back and forth between these two states based on their own needs, their acceptance of events, the context, and the needs and responses of others. The article has been important to me because it helped me realize the implications for the provision of comfort during the various states of suffering. Nurses are the caretakers of suffering. Understanding suffering, and the responses and needs of those who are suffering, rests squarely on the shoulders of nurses, and easing and alleviating suffering are the heart of nursing. Nurses are at the bedside throughout the course of illness, and they are often the only support for those suffering, both patients and their families. (Morse, 2001). Therefore, understanding the behavioral-experiential nature of suffering has a vital role in the practice of nursing and it helps one in offering the most comforting service to the patient who is suffering as well as the family which is affected. In conclusion, Toward a Praxis Theory of Suffering by Janice Morse has been one of the most fundamental articles which contribute to the effective nursing practice and one realizes the implications for the provision of comfort during suffering states.
Part Two
In the post responding to the article by Janice Morse, the student makes some essential points regarding the importance of the article which deals with the behavioral-experiential nature of suffering. According to the post, the student found the article bit tough to understand, although he/she managed to gather some essential arguments of the article. Thus, the student recognized the relevance for nurses to understand the experience of suffering of their patients as the nurses are at the bedside throughout illness and suffering, they are the only source of support for patients and their families. Also, the article reminds one that easing and alleviating suffering are the heart of nursing. However, to the student who wrote this response, it was the way the author integrated the concept of enduring in suffering which was most appealing. The article also was effective to the student in realizing that it is okay to cry during suffering and she recognized that crying (or even laughing hysterically) could have a positive impact on a person’s enduring process. Thus, the student came to know that these emotions help the person create equilibrium in the cycle that exists between enduring and its consequences on the person’s health. In conclusion, the article had a very important and positive result on the author of this post who was able to recognize the behavioral-experiential nature of suffering.
Reference
Morse, Janice. (2001). Toward a Praxis Theory of Suffering. Advances in Nursing Science. Aspen Publishers. 24 (1).pp 47-59.