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Tourism and indigenous Cultures

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……………………………………………………………….. 4 1.3 Rationale for Selecting the Research Topic ……………………………………….. 5 1.4 Scope and Limitations …………………………………………………………………….. 6 2. Literature Review ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 7 a. General Facts about Chamka …………………………………………………………… 7 b. Significance and Impact of Unique Culture, Language, and Religion on Tourism Industry ………………………………………………………….. 9 c. Socio-economic benefits of Tourism in the Development of the Bangladesh Economy ……………………………………………………………………… 11 d. Communication between the Bangladeshi Government and Chamkas …… 12 3. Discussion …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13 4. Conclusion and Recommendations ……………………………………………………………….. 15 References ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17 – 19 Chapter 1 – Introduction The term indigenous people is referring to a minority ethnic group of people that exists in each country (Coates, 2004, p. 12). Since most of the indigenous people are living in a place that is far away from civilization, this group of people manage to preserve their own set of unique culture and religion. Based on the 1991 Census, the Chamkas’ total number of population was 239,417 (Parbatya Bouddha Mission, 2012). In India, around 150,000 Chamkas are living in the states of Arunachal, Assam, Mizoram, and Tripura. whereas very few of them live in Cox’s Bazar district, Myanmar in Burma, and in Bangladesh (Parbatya Bouddha Mission, 2012). Chamka is one of the biggest indigenous groups of people that still exist in Bangladesh. Being one of the minority groups in Bangladesh, the Chamka are living their lives at a disadvantage. Because of the absence of strong government support, Chamkas who are currently living in Bangladesh do not have the same privileges that most Bangladeshi people are getting from the government. Up to the present time, almost all Chamka in Bangladesh are still living in a primitive age. Because of the presence of political and cultural separation between the Bangladesh government and this particular group of indigenous people, the Chamka do not have access to proper education, better employment opportunity, and medical assistance from the doctors and nurses. On the 13th of September 2007, the United Nations declared that the need to respect the rights of these indigenous people (UN News Centre, 2007). With a total of 30 votes in favour, 2 against and 12 absentions, the Human Rights Council supported the United Nations’ declaration with regards to the rights of the indigenous people (United Nations, 2007, p. 1). Although there is no existing universal law behind the United Nations declaration with regards to the rights of the indigenous people, respecting their rights could prevent us from violating the existing human rights law. Specifically the act of preventing the Chamkas to have access equal to proper education, better employment opportunity, and medical assistance from the doctors and nurses is a form of racial or tribal discrimination. To uplift the