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Theory of Reason and Knowledge

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Logic is the foundation of reason, which serves a useful purpose because it ensures that the information derived from it is based upon factual data that can be verified. But while this may be useful in the scientific field, it does not contribute effectively to the acquisition of knowledge.&nbsp. One example that may be cited in this context is the example of computers. These are machines that function purely on the basis of reason, but in some instances, the application of pure reason alone may result in a nonsensical or lopsided result that does not contribute to the acquisition of actual knowledge.
The common understanding is that knowledge can be enhanced through a reliance on the things that we know because this forms the basis for logical assumptions that are made. As a result, the set of things that are known are closed under entailment under deduction. As a result, any claim will be recognized to be true only if it can be substantiated as accruing or following from what is known. The implication under this approach that relies purely upon reason alone is therefore that knowledge will be limited because it cannot extend beyond the parameters of what is known and recognized as a factual matter. This theory of knowledge is based upon correlation, i.e, that if a person knows one entity X and this is related to another entity Y which is based upon the factual X, then the person who knows X directly may also know Y, albeit indirectly.
The strengths associated with the theory of reason are that knowledge that is derived therefrom tends to be solidly based in facts and has a scientific basis to it. As a result, it is very reliable. Applying a scientific approach to the theory of knowledge ensures that it is also practical in approach because it can be borne out through experimentation and is not purely reliant on abstract elements. But there are some weaknesses associated with the application of pure reason alone to the theory of knowledge.&nbsp.