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The Making of Disneyland

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This discussion stresses that beneath this feeling of joy and happiness lay a grim reality that plagued United States at that time. The author’s main argument is the prevalence of racial discrimination in the country. This racism found its way right into Disneyland. The recreational park housed Fantasyland. an area perhaps found in dreams. &nbsp.However the same park demonstrated the existence of racism, an aspect that can be a nightmare for many.&nbsp.

This paper discusses that the author cites numerous instances that establish the prevalence of racism in Disneyland. At the outset, the author states that akin to the postwar suburbs, Disneyland was not meant for the blacks and other minorities. The theme park was specifically meant for the white, middle class families. The entry fee was exorbitant and therefore only the affluent could afford to visit Disneyland and have a pleasurable experience. The high fee ensured that Disneyland was accessible to an “economically” homogenous group. Disneyland was located near new freeways. However, it was catering to the all-white neighborhoods that had emerged in the San Fernando Valley and Orange Country, claims the author. The author has categorically stated that Disneyland was not meant for the ethnic minority residing in the inner city. The most compelling evidence of racial discrimination inside Disneyland emerges from the fact that Walt Disney did not employ African Americans at the park. This policy continued till the civil right protests of 1963.