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The Impact of the Internet and Product Development

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The Impact of the Internet and Product DevelopmentThe Internet The internet is a worldwide system of computer networks that are interconnected and apply the standard Internet protocol suite in order reach the billions of users globally. Simply put, the internet is a network made up of networks consisting of millions of public, private, academic, business, and governing institutions networks, either local or global, linked together by an array of electronic, optical and wireless networking technologies. The Internet relays an extremely wide range of information data resource and services, including the inter-linked hypertext documents contained in the World Wide Web email supporting infrastructure.JustificationThough the internet started its development journey in the 1960s it is only in the 1990s that commercializing of the same Started. This period between the 1990s and today saw massive a leap in the number of internet users, with the same reaching 2.2 billion in 20101. Founded in or around 1976, Apple Inc.’s formative years were also the internet’s formative years hence close association of the two as Apple Inc., being a growing computer hardware company, produced hardware that was used hand in hand with the internet. Their growth therefore coincided. When internet marketing became a common phenomenon the company took the earliest opportunity to market itself through the internet. The company has kept pace with the latter’s growth in terms of number of customers and profitability and will continue to do so as the two are closely connected2.PersonalThe two billion people who get to visit the internet are able to learn about apple through its may adverts in its website and other popular sites including search engines. The marketing of the company is therefore personalized. The adverts have gone a long way to create and model the personalities and legacies of persons connected with apple such as its late icon, Steve Jobs3 . BusinessInternet marketing is largely responsible for apple’s business success tody. The thrird largest mobile phone producer in the world, Apple has placed over a billion adverts in the internet for the time it has been in operation4. As a result, apple is the moat admired company in the united states today.Aim: The aim of the extensive internet marketing is to give the company an edge over its competitors as through the internet, it can reach more potential customers than through other media5.The objectivesThe company aims to maintain its high customer base and it is convinced it can do so through solely marketing its products in the internet. The company also aims to disburse information on its products as fast as possible and the same can only be effectively achieved through the internet. Apple also considers a the internet the easiest way to get its customer’s feedback on its products6. The internet is also its most viable way of establishing a market in the developing countries as its growth in the development countries will coincide with increase in internet users as was the case globally7. References1 Internet World Stats, updated 31 March 2011. Retrieved 8 November 20112Celebrating 40 years of the net, by Mark Ward, Technology correspondent, BBC News, 29 October 20093Leonard, Devin (August 30, 2009). Hey, PC, Who Taught You to Fight Back?. The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/30/business/media/30ad.html?em. Retrieved March 30, 2010.4Peacock, Michael (2008). Selling Online with Drupal E-Commerce: Walk through the Creation of an Online Store with Drupal’s E-Commerce Module. Birmingham. p.2. 5 Jaakko Sinisalo et al. (2007). Mobile customer relationship management: underlying issues and challenges. Business Process Management Journal 13 6Apple Introduces iPhoto, Apple Inc., January 7, 2002. Retrieved August 15, 2008.7Patricia M. Thornton, The New Cybersects: Resistance and Repression in the Reform era. In Elizabeth Perry and Mark Selden, eds., Chinese Society: Change, Conflict and Resistance (second edition) (London and New York: Routledge, 2003), pp. 149–50.