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The Childrens Literature Choice Exemplified by the Peter Pan Play

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We see a character with a devil-may-care attitude and take his chances to put himself in grave danger. For example, the question of death is scary to any human being, and if you do happen to escape death by any narrow chance then believe you me, the thought of it will haunt you for a very long period of time. When Peter felt that he was going to die in the Marooner’s rocks, he felt scared yet he only felt one shudder run through him. Funnily enough, he describes the tragic death as an awfully big adventure.

Wendy Moira Angela Darling, daughter of George and Mary, is a female protagonist in the play. She is the firstborn followed by two other boys, John and Michael. Though her age is not specified, we see a girl who is growing up and possibly in her adolescence stage. She comes out as an agent of change from childhood to adulthood. Her efforts to enjoy the feelings associated with this stage are being turned down unknowingly by Peter who does not understand whatever she is undergoing (Birkin, 2003, p.78).

Wendy loved her childhood as she liked telling stories and fantasizing about it. She loved her father so much but was afraid of him because he had a high temper. This experience from her father could have made her dislike adulthood and given a chance maybe she could have wanted to remain a child. Well, such an opportunity knocked on the door when Peter took her brothers and her to the Neverland, where they can remain children forever.

This opportunity did not help her run away from her fears of being an adult as it made her realize the adult part of her when Peter and the lost boys requested her to be their mother. She acceded to their request and performed various tasks for them. In the due course, we see Wendy developing an interest to be married to Peter. Eventually, Wendy goes back home appreciating the values of maturity and postponing the thought of ever remaining a child (Birkin, 2003, p.57).