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Sociological Theorists

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Sociological theorists Sociological Theorists. One of the sociological theorists I identify with the most is Emile Durkheim who developed the functionalist perspective in sociology. Durkheim had a keen interest on the possibility of social order and how the society succeeds to maintain stability. I identify with Emile Durkheim for a number of reasons, which stem from the arguments he makes in the functionalism theory. First, Durkheim explains each component of the society in terms of the functions it plays to the stability of the entire society (Isajiw, 2003). Durkheim can be credited for his explanations that the entire system can be regarded more crucial than the sum of the parts, which constitute it. Further, he maintained that each of the parts that make up the society has an essential role to play in the success of the whole (Lukes, 1985). For Durkheim, all the parts in the society depend on each other, and no part can survive on its own. The theorist made significant contributions in explaining how the different parts relate. For example, he argued that the state and the family relate in that the state provides education to the children. the family pays taxes, which the state uses to facilitate its running (Thompson, 2002). The family relies on the school to educate their children. consequently, the children get desirable jobs, become law abiding citizens and pay taxes, which support the state. Durkheim can be identified with because of his argument that the parts making up the society have to produce order as well as stability (Tischler, 2010). The theory of functionalism has shaped and influenced my life in a number of ways. First, the theory has helped me learn the significance of consensus in the society and the basis for social order. Secondly, the theory has made me gain insights into the need for stability in the society and functions of all the components that make up the society. From the theory, I have learnt that the dysfunction of one of the parts of the system affects the functioning of the entire system (Ferantte, 2012). ReferencesFerantte, J. (2012). Sociology: A Global Perspective. New York: Cengage Learning. Isajiw, W. (2003). Causation and Functionalism in Sociology. London: Routledge. Lukes, S. (1985). Emile Durkheim, His Life and Work: A Historical and Critical Study. California: Stanford University Press. Tischler, H. (2010). Introduction to Sociology. New York: Cengage Learning. Thompson, K. (2002). Émile Durkheim. London: Routledge.