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Shakespeares literary devices

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There are thousands of remarkable literary authors around the world but Shakespeare may be considered the best literary writer of all times. There are at least three reasons to support this claim. First, Shakespeare wrote a number of poems and plays that are considered today as classics and are still being studied in schools. Second, his plays have been used by many literary authors that succeeded him. Many stories are based on Shakespeare’s plot. some directly incorporate Shakespeare’s plays, making the work appear as a play within a play. Third, Shakespeare makes use of literary devices that could serve as models for other writers to employ. These literary devices include mistaken identity, story-within-a-story, and use of potions. Some writers use these as themes but Shakespeare employs them as literary devices that greatly affect the plot. Mistaken identity is recurrent in Shakespeare’s plays. Among these plays include A Midsummer Night’s Dream and A Comedy of Errors. According to Draper (41), the device of mistaken identity is common in many Latin comedies that Shakespeare was fond of. For Draper, Shakespeare (43) uses mistaken identity for merriment in his comedies. However, one can argue that Shakespeare does not just use mistaken identity to effect comedy. Rather, he uses it as a literary device that affects the plot. In A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the mistaken identity that Puck commits turns out to be the major conflict in the play. Because of this, the fate of the characters becomes intertwined, as Lysander falls for the wrong woman, and causes woe to his real love, Hermia. Puck’s mistake is cunningly designed to break free from the tragedy employed in the old tale. Its inclusion leads to other events, such as the confrontation between Lysander and Helena, confrontation between Lysander and Demetrius, and finally, the conversation among the four lovers. It also provides the play another conflict, that is, to bring back the love of Lysander to Hermia, which is pursued towards the end. Likewise, the device of mistaken identity causes other events to take place, which make the play more interesting. Due to the mistake committed, the story plot takes a different shape. It causes panic to the fairy in the play, who needs to correct the mistake committed. It also causes anxiety to the lovers, especially to Hermia and Helena. Through the mistake, the love that Hermia and Helena feel for each of their lovers is tested. In addition, it also tests the strength of their personality. In Hermia’s case, when Lysander makes a change of heart, she fights for her love despite the hurting words Lysander tells her. In doing so, Hermia projects a strong personality imbued by assertiveness and loyalty, as reflected in the way she fights for her love. In same way, the mistake Puck commits leads to a better exposition of Helena’s character. Through it, Helena’s love for Demetrius is tested, but unlike the other, we see a weaker type of woman as reflected in her lines, When at your hands did I deserve this scorn? Is’t not enough, is’t not enough, young man, That I did never, no, nor never can, Deserve a sweet look from Demetrius’ eye, (Act 2, Scene 2) Additionally, Helena takes embarrassment in the affection the two male characters give her. Instead of being proud that the two guys fall for her in Act 3, Scene 2. Helena cannot believe the affection they offer. As such, the mistaken identity provides a better view of the characters. Moreover, the conflict caused by mistaken identity assigns importance to the fairies in the play. Through this, the presence of the fairies is justified, thus the audience cannot claim that they are only accidental or decorative characters. The twist in the plot, exposition of the characters and justification of other elements in the play demonstrate the significance of mistaken identity as a literary device and not just a theme. Mistaken identity is also very evident in A Comedy of Errors. Draper (43) claims that