Menu

Schizophrenia

0 Comment

The victim of the disease shows diverse signs of disturbances relating to their emotional and cognitive being. Basically, the victim shows signs of hallucination and an inability to hear and see. Research shows that schizophrenia symptoms have been categorized into three. They are positive, negative and disorganized type of schizophrenia. The positive symptom entails the deformation of the expected behavior of a person. Discrepancy in normal behavior relating to speech is regarded as a negative symptom of schizophrenia. The disorganized symptoms of schizophrenia are characterized by irregular behavior, tedious speech and wrong influence. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) explains the mental disorder based on positive and negative sides of the symptoms. According to DSM-IV, the symptoms are usually present in between one and six months and these are the symptoms which are used to define schizophrenia. The positive symptoms are also regarded as active symptoms because the hallucinations and delusions exist while the negative symptoms are loss of speech and emotional effects. The disorder’s existence is continuous starting from small signs and symptoms to rigorous states making it hard to differentiate from bipolar diseases having the same positive and negative symptoms. DSM-IV shows five divisions of schizophrenia. Individuals having paranoid schizophrenia show major hallucinations and delusions despite their cognitive skills and effect being intact. The second type is characterized by disrupted speech and behaviour. in this view, the person is said to have disorganized schizophrenia. The other type is catatonic schizophrenia. a person characterized by abnormal motor responses, for example, being resistant and always in a fixed position. Furthermore, their bodies show weird manners. The other type has no characteristics mentioned above. therefore they are regarded to be having undifferentiated schizophrenia. The fifth type relates to persons who have had schizophrenia before and are regarded as having residual schizophrenia (Durand and Barlow 2010). Historical View of Schizophrenia Schizophrenia has been studied for over 40 years but has remained the most difficult disorder in view of its causes and the features. Despite the longer period of study relating to schizophrenia, the origin and development are still hard to ascertain. Additionally, the history of the disorder shows that schizophrenic pathology and management of the disorder has attained another step. This is because there has been an improvement in research and development of the technology used to study the disease. For example, machines for studying the brain like brain imaging technology is now available. History shows that schizophrenia is viewed differently by different societies. The disease has different meaning to different people, for example, it has been used to describe the person’s personality, mental illness or feelings. Other cultures view individuals with schizophrenia as demonic or controlled by evil spirits. Conversely, others have considered the person as powerful spiritually making some of them to have a fear of the victim. The study of the diseases has so far improved as stated above but there are still many challenges as compared to other ailments. For example, health professionals can have an easier time dealing with cancer than with people suffering from schizophrenia marred with hallucination or delusions. The introduction showed