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Research proposal (English by Arabic Foreign Language learners)

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Order 284816 APPROPRIATE COMPLIMENTS BY ARABIC EFL LEARNERS TO AVOID MISUNDERSTANDING A Research Proposal Presented to The Faculty of
In Partial Fulfillment
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ABSTRACT
Making compliments successful in English by Arabic Foreign Language learners, to avoid circumstances of misunderstanding by the native English speakers or misunderstanding by the native speakers of English is the interest of this research. The study will also look into how the salutation evolved and what are the social connotations of such salutations among the different cultures within the Middle Eastern territories. Moreover the researcher would like to know how this salutation is accepted by the different cultures of other nationalities.
Qualitative and quantitative method of research will be employed by the researcher in gathering the data. Survey questions as well as questionnaires will be formulated consequently. The subsequent data will be computed for average mean, percentile, ranking and weighted mean.
Background of the Study
Most people say Arabic compliments are not mere accolades, but, they are relative to the cultural principles inculcated among the people similar to other cultures, which are words of gratitude for any virtuous deed. Conventionally, compliments have become a common part of human verbal communication in the various societies of people in the Universe.
Nearly all investigatory studies about human languages where compliments fit in are limited to grassroots viewpoints on how they gained the skills of verbal communication. This was supposed by Larisa and Furuoka in 2007 when they mentioned authors of similar studies like Truitt in 1995, Park in 1995, Kuntz in 1999, Kunt in 1997, Peacock in 1998, Sakui &amp. Gaies in 1999, Kimura et al in 2001, Siebert in 2003 and Bernat in 2006. Apparently, this may carry a lighter weight when used as a proof for the value of languages. This is because authenticities are often based on recorded truth and not on mere viewpoints.
Statement of the Problem
This study was concerned mainly with making compliments successful in English by Arabic Foreign Language learners, to avoid circumstances of misunderstanding by the native English speakers or misunderstanding by the native speakers of English
Specifically, the investigator was directed to answer the following questions:
1. What is the demographic profile of the selected respondents
2. What are the usual Arabic compliments used by the respondents in the English as Foreign Language
3. How are compliments made successful in English by Arabic Foreign Language learners, to avoid circumstances of misunderstanding by the native English speakers or misunderstanding by the native speakers of English
Significance of the Study
Knowledge on how to make Arabic compliments successful in English by Arabic Foreign Language learners, to avoid circumstances of misunderstanding by the native English speakers or misunderstanding by the native speakers of English is vital in the sense that its discovery would predict consequential studies of other languages. hence it is imperative to undertake this research.
Theoretical Framework of the Study
Most people say Arabic compliments are not mere accolades, but, they are relative to the cultural principles inculcated among the people similar to other cultures, which are words of gratitude for any virtuous deed. Nonetheless, realist like Al Falasi in 2007 supposed that words or terminologies usually employed in casual verbal communication are by products of individual communities’ adherence to ancestral practices and limitations within territories. Subsequently, words or terminologies in verbal communication can be said to be entrenched.
Scope and Delimitation of the Study
This research is delimited to the Arabic Foreign Language learners and native English speakers. This study focused on how to make Arabic compliments successful in English by Arabic Foreign Language learners.
The Research Method
The researcher will make use of a descriptive qualitative and quantitative method of research aimed to discover on how to make Arabic compliments successful in English by Arabic Foreign Language learners, to avoid circumstances of misunderstanding by the native English speakers. The chosen research methodology leads the researcher in shaping the main objective of the dissertation question and how it will be achieved.
The informational data will be gathered by the use of survey questionnaire which will be formulated by the researcher. The data that will be collected will be computed for average mean, percentile, ranking, weighted mean and simple linear regression.
The researcher will chose at least three teaching methodology. This will lead the researcher measure the efficiency of the Arabic compliments. The researcher will administer the post-test and pre-test to measure the Arabic compliments success in English by Arabic Foreign Language learners.
The Study Area
This study primarily focused on how to make Arabic compliments successful in English by Arabic Foreign Language learners, to avoid circumstances of misunderstanding by the native English speakers.
Bibliography
Al Falasi, Hessa. Just Say "Thank You": A Study of Compliment Responses. Eds. Paul Robertson and John Adamson. The Linguistics Journal, April 2007, Vol. 2, Issue1.
Cutting, J. (2002). Pragmatics and Discourse: A Resource Book for Students. London: Routledge.
(1958). Islam- The Straight Path: Islam Interpreted by Muslims (K. W. Morgan, Ed.). New York: Ronald Press.
Cedar, Payong. Thai and American Responses to Compliments in English. Eds. Paul Robertson and Joseph Jung. The Linguistics Journal, June 2006, Vol. 1 No. 2.
Koteyko, Nelya. Corpus Linguistics and the Study of Meaning in Discourse. Eds. Paul Robertson and Joseph Jung. The Linguistics Journal, June 2006, Vol. 1 No. 2.
Nikitina, Larisa and Fumitaka Furuoka. Beliefs about Language Learning: A Comparison between Novice and Intermediate Level Students Learning Russian at a Malaysian University. Eds. Paul Robertson and John Adamson. The Linguistics Journal, April 2007, Vol. 2, Issue1.
Patil, Z. N. On the Nature and Role of English in Asia. Eds. Paul Robertson and Joseph Jung. The Linguistics Journal, June 2006, Vol. 1 No. 2.
Rahimi, Ali. A Critical Discourse Analysis of Euphemization and Derogation in Emails on the Late Pope. Eds. Paul Robertson and Joseph Jung. The Linguistics Journal, June 2006, Vol. 1 No. 2.