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Research Methods on CODING AND TRANSCRIPTION FOR INTREVIEWING QUESTIONS AND ANSWER ON

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Interview Transcription Affiliation This paper entails coding and transcription of interviews conducted previously. The interviews were conducted to investigate health issues like obesity and diabetes and their attribution to poverty. Ten different people were interviewed. The interview questions were:
What policies on obesity do you perceive as having failed?
Why do you think these policies failed?
What should be the best strategy to be applied in handling the obesity problem?
What policies can you consider to be a disgrace in the fight against poverty, obesity and diabetes 2?
What can you cite as the major cause of failure of these policies?
Do the nutrition policies, zoning policies, labeling act help in reducing obesity?
What health policies would you recommend the government to implement in order to guarantee a diabetes free environment?
What should be done to encourage healthy eating habits?
Do you think that if the government offered meal vouchers to Americans living in deprived neighborhoods will reduce the rates at which consumers purchase and consume foods with high calories?
There has been recent creation and establishment of recreation parks despite the looming land and space crisis. Do you think this will encourage more people to participate in recreation activities such as swimming, sports and games?
Their responses portrayed both similarities and differences. The interview results were transcribed and coded accordingly to enhance data analysis (Ryder, 1966). This was done as follows:
Theme Number
Part. 1
Part. 2
Part. 3
Part. 4
Part. 5
Part. 6
Part. 7
Part. 8
Part. 9
Part. 10
1
Failed Policies
P1L1-2
P1L3
P1L3-4
P1L1-2
P1L3-4
P1L16-19
P4L12
P1L1-2
P1L3-6
2
Policy makers’ expectations
P1L3
P1L23-29
P2L13-19
P2L17
P1L1-2
P1L23-25
P1L3-2
P1L3-2
P4L13-19
3
Health Practitioners expectations
P1L6
P1L1-2
P1L23
P3L14-16
P3L9-10
P2L24-26
P1L1-2
P4L16-19
P1L1-2
4
Expectations of American Society
P2L5
P1L6
P2L17
P3L4-6
P3L16-19
P5L13-19
P3L8
P2L16-19
5
Consumption of high calorie foods
P3L4-6
P2L5
P3L9
P2L16-19
P2L3-9
P3L27
P5L13-19
P3L16-19
P4L26-27
6
Participation in exercise
P3L8
P3L9-10
P2L10
P5L13-19
P3L8
P5L22-23
P3L16-19
P5L18-19
7
Zoning laws aimed at preventing mushrooming of fast-food cafeterias
P3L9-10
P3L8
P4L1
P4L31
P5L5-12
P4L22-23
P5L22-29
P3L22-23
P4L22-23
8
Zoning laws in poor neighborhoods
P4L1
P4L22-23
P5L13-19
P3L15-23
P3L39
P3L16-23
P5L25-33
P4L14-19
P5L13-19
9
Hispanics and the blacks constitute of poor neighborhood
P4L2-3
P4L21
P4L13
P2L30-31
P4L25-32
P5L15-23
P5L28-31
P2L33-36
P3L15-23
10
nutritionally unbalanced food consumption
P4L4
P4L16-23
P4L19-24
P3L16-23
P5L28-31
P2L25-30
P5L13-19
P2L30-31
P4L16-23
11
lack of money to purchase nutritionally balanced foods
P4L5-8
P1L13-16
P4L16-24
P5L13-19
P4L1-5
P4L16-23
P3L15-21
P3L19-24
P1L13-26
12
High Priced foods
P4L10
P3L1-5

P4L16-24
P3L16-23
P1L34-38

P4L16-24
P2L13-16
13
False advertising of foods as ‘safe’
P5L1
P3L16-23
P4L14
P5L4
P4L16-23
P5L13-19
P3L15-23
P1L13-16

14
desirability of the current policies
P5L2-3
P2L13-11
P4L16-23
P1L13-16

P5L13-19
P5L28-31
P5L13-19
P5L13-16
15
Problem is due to poverty
P5L4
P1L34-38
P6L6-10
P3L16-23
P6L23-26
P4L26-33
P3L26-32
P6L6-10
P5L11-15
16
Obesity and Diabetes are related
P5L15-17
P4L31
P3L9-20
P5L26-33
P4L21-24
P3L16-23
P5L19-23
P4L16-23
P3L26-33
17
Food outlets offer high calorie foods
P5L18
P4L6-11
P1L34-37
P5L6-10
P6L6-10
P3L21-24
P3L9-20
P6L6-10
P5L13-19
18
Fast-food cafeterias deals with high carbohydrate foods
P5L19-20
P4L31
P3L29-40
P4L31
P4L25
P3L34-39
P1L34-38
P3L9-20
P4L31
19
shopping behaviors contributions
P5L21-25
P3L26-33
P6L6-10
P4L16-23
P4L26-40
P3L9
P3L28-31
P3L29-40
P1L34-38
20
Behavior in supermarkets and cooking areas
P5L31
P5L37
P6L13-16
P5L21-26
P6L1-5
P6L6-10
P4L16-24
P6L23-26
P6L13-16
21
Purchase of foods high in carbohydrates
P5L37
P6L6-10
P5L13-19
P4L16-24
P5L25-27
P6L21-24
P6L13-16
P2L25-27
P6L23-26
22
Consumption of food in foods high in carbohydrates
P6L1-5
P6L1-5
P6L6-10
P6L13-16
P6L6-10
P6L13-16
P6L6-10
P6L6-10
P6L6-10
23
Purchase and consumption of high calories foods
P6L6-10
P6L13-16
P6L1-5
P6L6-10
P6L13-16
P6L6-10
P6L21
P6L13-16
P6L13-16
24
high level of fats
P6L13-16
P6L21
P6L21
P6L21
P6L1-5

P6L13-16
P6L25-27
P6L21
25
minute fiber
P6L21
P3L28-31
P6L25-27

P6L25-27
P632
P6L25-27
P5L24-27
P4L25-30
26
foods labeled as ‘low fat’ or ‘safe’
P6L25-27
P632
P632
P6L25-27
P6L21
P6L21
P632
P6L25-27
P632
27
effects that on health
P632
P6L25-27
P6L21
P632
P632
P6L25-27
P6L21
P632
P6L25-27
From the above table,
Part. = Participant
P = page number
L = Line number
Simple coding explanation
All the 10 participants were interviewed based on the above questions. All the 27 themes presented in the table were presented by the participants but their arrangements appeared at different points in terms page numbers and lines with the pages. For instance, the theme of failed field policies, by the first participant, appeared in page 1 from line 1 to line 2. The same theme is presented in the first page but between line 3 and line 4 and in page 1 line 1 to line two for the 3rd participant (Ryder, 1966). The same theme appears in page 4 line 12 for the 7th participant. The same applies to all other themes for all the participants. A blank square implies that the specific theme presented along that specific raw was not tackled by the respective respondent. For example, the theme of minute fiber was not addressed by the fourth respondent.
References
Ryder, R. G. (1966). A Clerically Simple Procedure for Coding Interview Materials. American Psychologist, 21(8), 812-816.