Menu

Reading Responses of Trifles by Susan Glaspell

0 Comment

Reading Response for the Play Trifles by Susan Glaspell The play Trifles by Susan Glaspell was generally misleading though on close examination, it was interesting to read. On reading the initial section of the play, one finds it apparently unclear. Notably, it revolves around the story of two men who are investigating a motive for a murder while simultaneously. two women are trying to spend their time when they spot a dead bird (Bradford). While this particular trait of the play frustrated me, I decided to be curious to discover if it expressed another different meaning. Moreover, reading this the entire play made me recall the foremost time I watched the film Monster’s ball and I could not decipher what it was centered on. Though I still do not know what Monster’s ball meant, studying the play Trifles for the second consecutive time proved to me that it is different. Apparently, Glaspell’s indirect concentration became evident to me in the second study of the play. Symbolism is an exemplary aspect of the play. The dead bird that Mrs. Peter and Ms. Hale spotted is a symbolism of Foster’s intrinsic demise. The open cage of the bird emblemizes the wife’s new freedom found through the demise of her husband (Bradford). Compared to reality, we apply tangible items to emblemize the intangible ones every other day in life. For instance, a white dove is regularly used to emblemize peace. Moreover, the American flag shows liberty among other symbolism used in contemporary times. Glaspell’s indirect style proves to us that it is nonetheless a worthy style. She discusses the women’s place in the society through the entire play (Bradford). Men, who hold distinctive and respectable titles such as deputy and county sheriff use their time searching for touchable evidence and applying fancy methods to arrive at a solution but to eventually fail in their endeavors. However, the women, who I strongly suspect that they were simple housewives, solve the quandary ingeniously, quietly and cleverly. Notably, the women employ their individual knowledge regarding Minnie Foster to theorize and formulate possible reasons why she would have murdered her husband. Additionally, they apply their off-centered blanket stitching to hypothesize that she was surely nervous regarding something. Moreover, the women who never stepped on the scene of the crime discovered the dead bird, which is concrete evidence to depict and prove the motive why she would have murdered her husband (Bradford). In conclusion, in spite of the numerous great traits in the play Triples, there is an eventual downfall trait. The end of the play leaves the reader not knowing what occurs to Mrs. Wright. That is a cliffhanger that is quite a collapse and disappointment for curious readers like me, unlike those readers that enjoy reading classic whodunits. I would recommend that this is the time that the author, Glaspell, would have been succinct and direct with what was perspiring and give a hint of what would occur afterwards. Ending stories devoid of a definite ending has always been disappointing for me when reading. Works CitedBradford, Wade. Trifles by Susan Glaspell – Plot and Character Analysis. N.d. Web. 24 April 2008. lt. http://plays.about.com/od/plays/a/trifles.htmgt..