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Postmodernism Power and Discourse

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Postmodernism is principally unconvinced of explanations which claim to be valid for all groups, cultures, traditions or races. Instead, postmodernism focuses on the comparative truths of each person or situation. Therefore, to the postmodern perception and understanding, all which is important is interpretation. The implication being that reality only exists through the interpretations of what the world means to individuals. As a matter of fact, the term ‘post’ in postmodernism implies that it opposes the existence of any ultimate principles, in its place emphasizing that the results of an individual’s experiences could be imperfect and relative as opposed to assured and universal.
The western world, politics, truth, right, and wrong are some of the core subjects tackled in postmodernism discussions. With regards to Western society, postmodernists suggest that it is just a society of outdated lifestyles concealed under impersonal and faceless bureaucracies. Such a society, according to postmodernists, should move beyond their primitiveness of ancient traditional thoughts and practices (Nealon &amp. Giroux, 2012). Specifically, postmodernists oppose certain Western practices such as the building and the use of weapons of mass destruction, which only encourage unlimited consumerism and fosters a wasteful society at the expense of the earth’s resources and environment. What is more, such practices fail to serve the fair and equitable cultural and socioeconomic needs of the populace. With regards to right and wrong, postmodernists believe that there isn’t such a thing as absolute truth since truth shaped by the error-prone outside world. That is, no one has the authority to define truth or impose personal ideas of right and wrong on others. Politically, postmodernists assert that the West’s tendency to suppress equal rights should be protested at since its&nbsp.capitalistic economic system lacks equal distribution of services, goods, and remunerations (Nealon &amp. Giroux, 2012).&nbsp.