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Physical and Verbal Bullying in Schools

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Physical and Verbal Bullying in SchoolsIntroductionBullying is a norm that has taken root in our school system. Bullying refers to the aggressive physical, verbal and emotional abuse that is directed towards a particular group of people, especially those considered weaker or of less strength. Normally, this behavior is done repetitively towards others mainly basing on gender, race, religion and ability or strength. Bullying occurs in many settings including the workplace setting and school setting. Bullying in schools is as one of the worst forms of intimidation and torture. The victim in bullying (the target) is usually unable to help himself/herself due to the circumstances in place. This is because, many people intimidate a single individual or a small group of individual, and therefore, it becomes difficult for the target to get help. It is a few who are brave enough to go and report this to the authorities. Physical bullying may include hitting, pushing, spitting or kicking an individual. Verbal bullying may include calling someone derogatory statements or racial slurs. Social bullying is the deliberate isolation of an individual from the rest.Adolescence bullying in the school settingBullying in adolescents is a common phenomenon in educational institutions. The attributes that differentiate the bullies and the targets are. ethnicity, socio-economic status, physical appearance, scholastic ability, moral beliefs, religion and sexual orientation. Bullying in the school setting has various effects, both on the bully and the bullied. For one, bullying affects a child’s overall development, whether physically, emotionally, ethically and in terms of language and cognitive functions. Secondly, bullying affects the learning environment of the bullies and the bullied.Being a victim of bullies during school years affects a child physically since such children suffer physical abuse and torture. Bullying is a repetitive action. hence, when bodily harm is done continuously, one suffers bodily harm. Normally, the bully is well built than the bullied. hence, it becomes difficult for one to defend themselves from this harm. Emotional harm is by far the most detrimental effect in school bullying. The bullied are affected psychologically, and it becomes difficult for them to do away with these thoughts. This continues haunting them for the rest of their school years and even beyond.Bullying affects students academically since the intimidation and aggression directed towards them affects them psychologically, and this compromises learning activities. This affects the learning environment generally since a gap is created between the bullies and the bullied. A noteworthy school environment is one whereby there are no divisions between students. When such division exists, then learning activities are affected, and this is not healthy for a school.Countermeasures to School BullyingGetting a solution to bullying requires the input of all the stakeholders in an education system. This includes parents, teachers, administrators, subordinate staff members and the students. In order to combat bullying in a school, an anti-bullying program needs to be put in place, and this should include all the stakeholders. The primary countermeasure needs to come from parents since it is their sons and daughters who are bullied or who are bullies. It is the role of the parent to control their children in case they are identified to be bullies. However, the input of the school administration and the teaching staff is mandatory since they are the ones who should enforce laws that punish any students involved in wrongdoing. Students also have a role to play, as they should be taught to live together as a family without separating each other in terms of race, sex, physical attributes and scholastic ability. Putting all this in place will control the norm in educational institutions around the country.ReferencesArseneault L, Walsh E. Bullying Victimization Uniquely Contributes to Adjustment Problems in Young Children: A Nationally Representative Cohort Study. Pediatrics Vol. 118 No. 1 July 2006, pp. 130-138.Cleave J V, Davis MM. Bullying and Peer Victimization Among Children With Special Health Care Needs. Pediatrics. Vol. 118 No. 4 October 2006, pp. e1212-e1219.Gini G, Pozzoli T. Association between Bullying and Psychosomatic Problems: A Meta-analysis. Pediatrics. Vol. 123 No. 3 March 2009, pp. 1059-1065.Derived from http://factsaboutyouth.com/posts/bullying-at-school-never-acceptable/. Derived on 15th April, 2012