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Persuasive message

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As we persuade others, it is all about selling our ideas, which is definitely applicable to everything, especially in our life and career, to get what we want. There is nothing much physical in persuasion, it is all about thought processes. It is wise to remember that progress and growth are dependent on how useful our brain can function for us. As an assistant marketing officer, I had the opportunity to get promoted in another branch, pending the defense and approval of the sales blitz campaign that management required. Audience: I was subjected to one-half day of interview with the stockholders and the top management officials. I was aware that some of the stockholders were not receptive to my ideas, and some of the officials did not want me to be promoted. I made it a point to mention the names of those whom I perceived to be hostile in a patronizing sound, as if the ideas injected in my project were suggested by them. I was aware they had a high level of interest, I was able to cut to the chase quickly, and went directly to the key messages (na 2004). Object of Persuasion: The product we were trying to sell is a residential property under the real estate industry. The competition with the other real estate companies for the kind of market we wanted to monopolize was quite stiff, particularly in the area where I will be transferred, which was not performing well at that time. I proposed to lower the selling price, and to allocate additional budget for special incentives for the Account Consultants, a kind of motivation that is badly needed in that area. Argument: I presented a graph, that depicted the trends in the sales productivity when there were promotions and when no promotions were offered to the customers. I had to defend my proposal because it entailed additional cost on the part of the company, which they were not willing to accede to at the start. I had to commit a high degree of assurance that with the approval of the recommendation, the sales production will definitely be on the upward direction. The graphs I presented also included the market share of the company and its competitiveness in terms of selling price and attraction. Series of computations were submitted to show how the extra costs can be covered with the promise that a certain level of production will be delivered. Credibility: The support of my immediate supervisor lent me a considerable amount of credibility that was perceived by the audience. My experience and record of performance within the company, likewise led the audience to presume that I was focused on a goal and a vision. Credibility is more than just expertise. Credibility is a combination of expertise and trustworthiness (Eikenberry, 2007). I have proven several times in the past that I can deliver productivity, thus I was worthy of their trust, and having belief in myself allowed me to exude confidence. I concentrated on eye-contacts, especially to those who were having doubts about me. I cited several examples that were factual with regards to our sales output that I had influence on. I chose to be wise by not compromising my integrity when I gave them my facts. Passion and enthusiasm in my work had always been contagious, and at that instance, I made sure they were apparent during the presentation. I followed what I had read in a book, that when I was challenged, I did not minimize his feelings nor did I ridicule his questions. I realized, when I need to persuade somebody, I can disagree without being disagreeable (Criswell, 1999). When persuading somebody to do something for me or to give me what I want, I have to be an authority and I should be worthy of their trust, these are the strengths I have to sustain and to learning is always an on-going process. Finally, the best result that can be gained in my favor, is when I can offer a win-win solution, because no person in his right mind will ever refuse when he can gain. The committee approved my recommendation with minimal correction. Works Cited: Criswell, W. (1999). What makes a Winner. Being Wise in Your Relationships, 16, (59 – 60). Eikenberry, K. (2007). Influence and credibility. Retrieved from http://www.sideroad.com/Leadership/influence-credibility.html n.a (2004). Know your audience. The Total Communicator, 2(4). Retrieved from http://totalcommunicator.com/vol2_4/knowaudience.html