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Orientalism in the World of Artists and Literary Figures

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Said pinpoints some assumptions made by the West about the Orient. He assumes that the West perceives Arabs as dishonest, menacing, anti-western and irrational. The text reveals that the thoughts presented in it are in opposition to how he considers the West to think of themselves (5). Therefore, he outlines his broadly projected image of the people of Arabic nature as they feature in the minds of the Western people. Specifically, he acknowledges that the Arabs exist in the western minds as “others.” According to them, anyone who is not one of them belongs to the category of others. The author addresses his issues using assumptions that one may risk considering to be truthful (7). If one takes such a positive stance, his ideologies and relations with the Arabs may be jeopardized. Hence, while considering Said’s arguments one should be cautious to avoid bias.
The call for a new perception and treatment of “the Orient” that permits the independent representation of authors who belong to the Orient as opposed to the reliance on the second-hand representation is valuable. In respect to the profound dependence on other personalities for ideas, it is significant to notice the widespread use of the word “orient” on almost half of the world. The mentioning of a greater part of the world as orient expands the bracket of disparity and intensifies the divide on ideology and identity. However, making such broad generalization is unwarranted in the modern day as nations such as Egypt and the Chinese.