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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Analysis of the Disease Cryptosporidiosis

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It considered an important source of morbidity and mortality in young children. Every year about 400-500 people in New York alone is infected by the parasite. It has been known to cause short term diarrhea in young children but if severe may even cause long term problems in immuno-compromised persons (Guerrant, p. 707-13). This parasite is usually found in the soil food and water, or surfaces that are known to come in contact with feces. It is however not known to spread via contact with blood (CDC). Most Infections tend to spread by the oral-fecal route. That entails the droppings of an infected animal and the transmission of the parasite via the mouth. This parasite can also spread by person to person, by eating contaminated food and by drinking contaminated water. It is in fact because the parasite is transmitted via the oral-fecal route that it is often found in people with poor hygiene, diapered children and people with diarrhea. The infection can also spread by eating contaminated, uncooked food and also by touching hands which may be infected with the parasite to the mouth. Exposure to feces via sexual contact may also be one more source of infection (CDC). Never the less it is important to note that a short term infection may have long term consequences (Guerrant, p. 707-13). The degree of infection is usually directly related to the severity and onset of disease. Some adults with incompetent immune systems such as seen widely in HIV positive patients may even be infected with more than one type of genus of Cryptosporidium or in worse cases more than one type of organism. Adult human beings with congenitally suppressed illnesses are very likely to develop several severe forms of the disease.Also more prone to infection are individuals with an HIV positive serotype. As mentioned earlier due the nature of their fragile immune system they are much more at risk of developing a severe form of the illness caused by the Cryptosporidium.