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Medico Legal Aspects and the Radiographers Scope of Practice

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The council’s conduct and competence committee provide a verdict on practices that contravene HCPC’s set standards (HCPC, 2015).Incorporating the law into the field of medical practices gives an insight into the power of the law. The force of the legislation is perhaps the reason for ethical and professionalism in medical practices. The very laws originate ethical concerns and the expectations that the public places on civil servants. This work examines a court case involving physicians and a patient, where the failure of a doctor to stick to the professional requirements caused harm to the patient. The work depicts the judicial proceedings about health matters and elaborates on the right procedures for handling issues at workplaces. The legislation, in this case, relates to the examination of the various health policies, which this work also explains.Based on court proceedings, the radiographer failed to perform an X-ray on the patient. The radiographer worked for the Hertfordshire Hospital University Trust, where he was to give instructions to practicing students. The medical practitioner was supposed to be a role model to the pupils in the Radiography Course. The competence that radiographers exhibit the result from the periods of training they undergo. Power can carry out the actions of an occupation to the expected levels during the time for which you work (The University of Exeter, 2015). Training makes the people concerned to be both fits for the purpose and the fit for practice.The scope of professional practice requires that radiographers work using the safest and the most efficient techniques for the patients (Scope of Professional Practice, 2015). The patient in this case scenario was weak, something that the radiographer, Mr. Porter knew. He was instructed to fetch the patient from another ward and realized his inability to walk by himself. He opted to give the patient a wheelchair, which isthe best action for those who cannot walk (Long, Frank amp. Enhrlich, 2012).