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Measures to Neutralize the Consequences of the Hurricane Katrina

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Hurricane Katrina Contributed To a Crisis Event
Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the morning of August 29th 2005, it had a category 3 rating on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale (HISTORY.com, 2015). With it came unimaginable destruction of structures and facilities (Gerstein, 2008). Moreover, the Hurricane Katrina created a shortage of fuel and other economic challenges.
Conflicts of interest: Impacts and Remedies,
Like all disasters, Katrina placed doctors, nurses and other professionals who were in a capacity to respond to the situation in a rather precarious situation where they had to choose between fleeing and saving their families as well as themselves and staying to assist with the rescue mission and caring for the victims. By staying, they risked more than injury or death.
Executive Handling of the Financial Crisis
The government authorized the use of winter gasoline to cater for the shortage of fuel.
The government lifted restrictions on boutique fuel requirements that opened the American market to foreign refineries that did not meet EPA requirements.
The response averted a much worse situation of widespread shortage of fuel which undoubtedly would have had a harder impact on the economy (Foundation for Teaching Economics.com, 2015).
Concepts in Public Administration
There was unprofessional handling of the situation by the authorities (Moynihan, 2009), in particular the time it took for Federal Emergency Management Agency to set up operations in New Orleans, who furthermore did not seem to have a reliable plan of action (HISTORY.com, 2015). The problem was viewed as administrative as the head of the agency at that time had no prior experience of crisis management or disaster relief.
Case Studies
The case study by Hori &amp. Schafer shows how the Hurricane Kartrina led to the displacement of hundreds of thousands of Louisiana citizens (2010). The displaced citizens lost their jobs and suffered from income declines and numerous diseases.
The study by Weaver &amp. Vozikis shows how the national and state government sought to mitigate businesses from the effects of the Hurricanes Katrina through bridge loans offered by the state&nbsp.of&nbsp.Louisiana Bridge Loan Program (2010).
Literature Review
The manner with which the government responded to the disaster has been faulted by several analysts, they all agree upon the fact that the response should have been quicker and more organized. However the International Risk Governance Council agrees that the hurricane was no routine emergency, it presented a unique problem that required unorthodox decision making skills (Moynihan, 2009). However, Saundra, S. (2008) points out the critical fields which the response teams failed to deliver expected results and the reasons behind this failure.
Annotated Bibliography
Dolfman, M., Wasser, S.F., &amp. Bergman, B. (2007). The effects of Hurricane Katrina on the New Orleans economy. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2007/06/art1full.pdf?q=the-nation-entertainment-chart
This paper gives a detailed explanation of the hurricane’s effect on the economy of New
Orleans. It explains how the Katrina demeaned tourism, port operations, and educational services that defined New Orleans economy. The article compares pre and post-Katrina New Orleans on various fronts mostly exports and labor markets.
Moynihan, D. P. (2009). The Response to Hurricane Katrina.Retrieved from http://irgc.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Hurricane_Katrina_full_case_study_web.pdf
The article explains the problems presented by the disaster to the bodies tasked with rescue. Missions, names these bodies and explains their short comings and offers possible solutions. Moreover, the article describes the risk factors of the disaster and the aspects that led to poor response to the event. Indeed, it shows how response to Katrina was a failure since the government responders lacked the necessary skills to address the disaster.
Schneider, S. (2005). Administrative Breakdowns in the Governmental Responce to Hurricane Katrina. Public Administration Review, 65(5), 515-516.
This paper explores the inadequacies of the government’s response to the disaster beginning with the faltering mobilization of resources to unfocused manner of operation and the personnel problems that dogged the rescue mission.
References
Dolfman, M., Wasser, S.F., &amp. Bergman, B. (2007). The effects of Hurricane Katrina on the New Orleans economy. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2007/06/art1full.pdf?q=the-nation-entertainment-chart
Foundation for teaching Economics.(2015) When Disaster Strikes What can Government Do?
Gerstein, M. (2008). Flirting with Disaster: Why Accidents are Rarely Accidental. New York: Union Square Press.
HISTORY.com. (2015). Hurricane Katrina. Retrieved from http: //www.history.com/topics/hurricane-katrina#
Hori, M., &amp. Schafer, M. J. (2010). Social costs of displacement in Louisiana after hurricanes Katrina and Rita.&nbsp.Population and Environment,&nbsp.31(1-3), 64-86.&nbsp.
Moynihan, D. P. (2009). The Response to Hurricane Katrina.Retrieved from http://irgc.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Hurricane_Katrina_full_case_study_web.pdf
Retrieved from http://www.fte.org/teacher-resources/lesson-plans/disasterslessons/lesson -3-when-disaster-strikes-what-can-government-do/
Schneider, S. (2005). Administrative Breakdowns in the Governmental Responce to Hurricane Katrina. Public Administration Review, 65(5), 515-516.
Vigdor, J. (2008). The Economic Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 22(4), 135-54.
Weaver, K. M., &amp. Vozikis, G. S. (2010). The economic impacts of a hurricane disaster bridge loan program in southern Louisiana: The aftermath of hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The Journal of Applied Business and Economics, 10(4), 63-75.