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Managing Project Closure

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The focus of this work is to demonstrate the ability to identify the closure point and build this into the project plan and to allow for appropriate corrective action if changes are needed.According to the work of Young (2010), the most difficult part of a project is closure. Young states that it is “easy to become focused on the goals of the project and emotionally engaged with the team and stakeholders, such that it is tempting to allow the project to continue on to deliver ‘addi9tional’ value.” (2010) The project manager must “retain clarity” as to the goals and objectives of the project. Young states that in practically all cases “this should be the delivery of the project scope, within a specified time period and budget.” (2010) The fundamental failure in governance of a project is stated by Young to be allowing the project to “run on…” (2010) In order for the project to be successful, it is necessary according to Young (2010) to ‘stick to the plan’ and to ‘communicate’ with the team and key stakeholders. In addition, Young states that the project manager should “ensure that change management is adhered to”. (2010) Furthermore, resources must be monitored closely and managed proactively. (Young, 2010, paraphrased) It is necessary that project closure is both “recognized and documented” and that the project closure contains the following elements:It is reported that projects may end either as a success or failure and specifically stated is that success “means that the project has achieved its cost, time, and performance objectives” while failure means that one or more of the cost, schedule, and performance objectives have not been met.” (CIT Solutions Pty Ltd, 2009) Each stakeholder should clearly understand:Included in a project closure report are the items which include the title of the project, the number of the project, the effective date for project closure, the reasons for the closure.