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According to these theories, some people may fail to recognize health preventive services because of their beliefs or environment conditions. The variables I would target when conducting health intervention are children aged 6-11, adolescents aged 12-19 years, and the poor who lack adequate treatment of tooth decay. Through social and behavioral theories, I would evaluate the conditions that promote tooth decay or oral health. In this case, I would recognize that community water fluoridation is the greatest public health achievement. I would spend every dollar in the community on water fluoridation to save the treatment cost of dental decay. To boost oral health program, I would create awareness on the importance of water fluoridation. School based dental programs would also help to deliver health to populations at risk of tooth decades such as low income households, children, and adolescents. I would increase the percentage of children participating in sealant programs to save the cost of public health. I would ensure that the poor, members of ethnic or racial minority groups, and elderly with severe dental decay receive good oral health. Reference Coreil, J. (2010).Social and behavioral foundations of public health. Los Angeles: Sage. Part 2 Oral Cancer In the United States, over 30, 000 people are diagnosed and 8, 000 die each year due to oral cancer (Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013). Oral cancer is the leading cause of most deaths in the world. With this concern, many nations have established the need to enact preventive measures to reduce the risk of oral cancer. The direct risk factors of oral cancer include alcohol and tobacco use, sun exposure, HPV infection, and chemoprevention. It is crucial to communicate and collaborate with groups and individuals on oral health issues to reduce the risk factors that trigger oral cancer. Directive and Indirect Risk factors Tobacco use especially cigars, pipes, cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco is the major cause of oral cancer. Second-hand smokers are also at a high risk of getting oral cancer. Alcohol is a direct risk factor of oral cancer, especially hard liquor and beer increases the risk of developing the disease. Those who use both tobacco and alcohol are at a higher risk of developing oral cancer than those who do not. Sun exposure is a major indirect that increases the risk of developing lip cancer that often occurs on the lower. Avoiding the sun or applying sun screen lipstick may reduce the risk of developing lip cancer. People infected with HPV are at a high risk of developing oral cancer. People who have undergone chemotherapy are at a high risk of developing oral cancer. Tobacco users who may have had oral cancer are at a high risk of developing a second cancer within the oral cavity or nearby areas such as throat, vocal chords, nose, windpipe, and oesophagus. A study by Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (2013) indicates that, poor diet and nutrition show a small risk for developing oral cancer. People who eat less fruits and vegetables in their meals are less likely to develop the illness. Some people believe that the increase of Body Mass Index (BMI) is linked with the risk