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Lukesa’s third dimension of power

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In the theories above mentioned, power requires a kind of relationship where there exists an entity who displays an observable and concrete behavior of being able to manipulate the entity who is subjected to this same manipulation. In the dialectics of power, this kind of conception is labeled as the first dimension of power by which the analysis centers on the observable conflicts of interests and its actors who would claim victory by having its interests prevail over the matter and the losers who would yield to the victor’s scheme. Moving forward, while the first dimension of power limits the definition to what is external and observable behaviors of domination, the second dimension digs deeper into the very nature of power. For the proponents of this notion, power is also exercised subtly by manipulating the process of decision-making or the lack of it. Here, power is not necessarily highly observable as and exclusively executed by the dominant alone. Even the subjugated is also able to exercise this kind of power by means of manipulating a situation that would generate only the kind of results that are deemed “safe” or “acceptable”. Hence, the dominant’s power is not necessarily outwardly challenged and therefore will not create a substantial external conflict.