Menu

Lewin’s Model of Change

0 Comment

It is also comprehensive and relevant that it has not required revisions – unlike others – to remain relevant to its subject. The major concepts of this theory are unfreeze, change, and refreeze (freeze) (Gerth, 2013).This stage comprises readying the organization to acknowledge that change is inevitable. Preparation involves dislodging the existing status quo before starting to construct a new strategy of operating (Gerth, 2013). Crucial to this is creating a powerful message demonstrating why the status quo cannot continue. This is the most convenient to develop when the organization can attest to declining revenue, worrying client satisfaction surveys, poor financial results, etc. These indicate that things must change in a way that all stakeholders can understand (Schunk amp. Meece, 2014). Successful preparation of the organization requires starting at its core – the people in charge of driving the change should confront the notions, values, behaviors and attitudes that presently define it.After the risk created in the unfreeze phase, the change phase is where the organization starts resolving its risk and looking for new approaches to doing things. People start behaving and believing in ways that back the new dimension. The shift from the unfreeze stage to this phase does not occur overnight (Schunk amp. Meece, 2014). Employees take time to accept the new dimension and proactively participate in the transition. The Change Curve, an affiliate change model, concentrates on the specific concern of personal changes in a dynamic environment and is appropriate for comprehending this particular issue more comprehensively (Schunk amp. Meece, 2014).As the changes happen and people have accepted the new methods of working, the organization is primed for refreezing (Schunk amp. Meece, 2014). The superficial signs of this phase are a stable company chart, uniform job descriptions, etc. The refreeze phase should also