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This paper shall discuss wildlife-based tourism, its attractions, and its negative and positive impact on wildlife, on the patrons, and Mother Nature in general. It shall discuss how it has successfully drawn in a largely European, middle class and affluent group of tourists to both the benefit and the detriment of the wildlife.
In recent years, African safaris have become a very attractive activity for many tourists, but never more so than for the European, middle-class, and affluent ones. Big-game hunting, which is part of the African safari experience, has attracted many middle and high-class tourists from the Western hemisphere. These affluent tourists are very much willing to spend large amounts of their money in order to have the opportunity to get away from their normally stressful lives. These tourists also seek the thrill of being immersed in wilderness adventures while being able to relax in a more natural environment. They seek these adventures in order to relieve their stress and anxiety. in some instances to experience the spiritual and profound (Newsome, 2005). The big-game hunting sport usually culminates in the awarding of trophies for the best hunter among the participants, but this achievement usually plays a secondary role to the natural adventure that they get to experience through wildlife-based tourism. This form of wildlife-based tourism is only seen in countries and areas with strict and capable monitoring measures in place. This ensures that big-game hunting does not unnecessarily endanger ecological balance and is safe for tourists. And the most important benefit on the part of the government and the locals is that big profit is coming in from this wildlife-based tourism. “Returns to governments accrue from land leases and trophy fees, apart from the indirect economic benefits of tourism” (Roth &amp. Merz, 1997). This income flow is very much