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Internal Monitoring for a Stronger Police Force

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A metaphor is something that is used to signify an idea through example, and therefore this is an objective example of applying something that may be completely unrelated objectively, but still has meaning as it is seen to relate to a larger concept. In the case of the broken windows theory, this larger concept is the assumption that, basically, one thing leads to another. This is related in some ways to the previous objective portrayal of the domino metaphor, in which it only takes one domino falling to make many other dominos fall. Objectively, in terms of the broken window theory, The germ of the idea is simple and compelling. A broken window–or a littered sidewalk, a graffito, or what you like–does no great harm to a neighborhood if promptly addressed. But left untended, it sends a signal: that no one cares about this neighborhood, that it is a safe place to break things, to litter, to vandalize. Those who engage in such behaviors will feel safe here. And once these minor miscreants have become well established, perhaps it will seem a safe enough neighborhood in which to be openly drunk (Siegel et al., 2006). The first part of this statement is very objective by nature. Zero tolerance programs are also features of traditional policing.
Traditional policing involves theory and other issues. It is also anticipated that results will be mixed in terms of officers’ perceptions of ethics training as an effective option to cut down on misconduct. Usually, the content of ethics training consists of adopting one philosophical framework and discussing hypothetical or researched ethical dilemmas within that framework. To be sure, examples of ethical dilemmas for criminal justice students and practitioners can be gathered from newspapers, books, and journal articles.nbsp.