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Intelligence and Warfare

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The role of intelligence in relation to war and security has become vital to the U.S. and the world at large. Understanding where the adversary is, what they are doing, their equipment and capability have always been of immense advantage to a party. This has particularly been evident after the end world wars and the cold war. The objective of this paper is to explore the relationship between intelligence and the conduct of the war. It will also examine whether there is any traditional perspective on this relationship, and how this has changed in a world of increased complexity. This paper will also discuss whether intelligence officers and the military co-located in a world of complexity and why this could be so.As earlier stated, intelligence gathering forms an integral part of the war in the world today. Arguably, no single successful war has ever been reported that has no element of intelligence. The role of intelligence in the modern arena can be traced back to the cold war era and has more recently been witnessed in the war between the US and its allies and Iraq. All these wars have only been won due to the role of intelligence in providing commanders with timely, accurate, predictive, relevant, and tailored information about the enemy. This argument is supported by two modern writers, Michael Handel and John Ferris from North America, who have reflected extremely on intelligence in war. The two writers concluded that intelligence is knowledge, and knowledge cannot be measured and that intelligence involves forecasting. Ferris on his part described the chain of small advantages that excellent intelligence can provide arguing that in the Pacific War, American Signal Intelligence played a crucial role as it allowed the US to defeat Japan faster and without incurring high costs that could have otherwise been being it that the US had directlyengaged Japan in the war using atomic bombs and without amphibious assaults on Kyushu.