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I will put it later

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Full Analysis on Michelle Obama’s Speech at DNC Michelle Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Committee on the fourth of this month was widely and graciously applauded. Even before she started talking, the warm welcome of the participants already called her to give a satisfactory speech. She did well with her introduction, thanking Ellen Brye, the military mom who did the honors. She recognized her family’s importance in the society and reassured the presidential family’s support for them. She then went on to talk about the president’s and her vision for the country. The First Lady shared how they have respectively been raised by their own circle of families who grew, knowing what hardship is all about. She reminisced how they, as a young couple, experienced the difficulties they have been through as a consequence of their student loans and related it to how the president feels toward students’ needs and what he did to help them get better services. The content of her speech were mostly based from her familial background and experiences. The speech seems well rehearsed because even though the speaker’s own stories were told, the result was short and to the point. If the speech was done extemporaneously, there is the great possibility that Obama could have gotten around the bush but it was not. Her stories were carefully chosen and her statement were meticulously versed to sound as formal as possible but personal enough to create the drama that made her listeners agree with her thoughts and applaud her.
Taking into consideration the fact that the first lady is already used to delivering speeches, one might say it could have been an impromptu. However, the speech seems to have been purposefully made to impress the audience by reaching out to them with the message that the family is not any different from all the other families represented by the participants. Moreover, the stories have been strategically arranged not just to present a smooth flow of the narration but to allow also the speaker to put in the essence of why she was telling the stories. For instance, she talked a lot about their parents so that a listener might wonder about their roles in what she was trying to tell them. Eventually, it was made clear that her speech was also a call to the people to continue working despite the hardships they experience, thinking not about their present situation but hoping that their children or grandchildren’s future would be better.
The First Lady made an impressive speech. It was so effective that it accomplished its goal of having the approval of the listeners and encouraging them to continue their support for the president. Although it was not directly stated, the implied objective of the speech can be understood from what the First Lady quoted from the president’s statement saying, We’ve got so much more to do. It solicited the support of the listeners to the politician in an ambiguous manner. In addition, although the speaker stuttered in some parts of the speech, it could have been deliberately done so to create some effect to the speech as being extemporaneous. If not, this is one thing the speaker should get rid of. What made Mr.s Obama’s speech more effective was the emotions she showed as she spoke especially towards the end of her talk. It was coupled by the raising of the volume of her voice and tone as she concluded with the call for the people’s support to stand with the president in his vision for the nation.