Menu

Hitch

0 Comment

Hitch Movie Review Hitch is a comical romantic movie that highlights the romantic survival wits in highly competitive NewYork romance. It remains specifically designed to display available survival techniques for men who are in love with seemingly incompatible women. These women either rank much above them or are very cute and difficult to manage. The paper expounds on how Hitch employs the technique of nonverbal cues in communication between characters in the movie (Rodger, 1). Imperatively, various comical effects relates with the use of non-verbal cues in romance and within the movie.
The movie entails scenes where individual characters are trapped within romantic situations where they cannot express themselves. They feel like they want to talk but cannot because they either are feeling inferior or are trapped in unknown phobia. The scene opens on a Valentine Day with Hitch (Willy Smith) as a date doctor. He understands women so well and is out to aid his friends attract, maintain, and entertain their coveted cute ladies. Hitch acts comically by employing his professional background and knowledge about women as a doctor in helping his friend establish romantic relationships.
Smith emphases the use of non-verbal cues such as how to make one’s eye look heroic, what to tell women at the first ate and what one should not say to such women. The date doctor’s advice involves many strategies, both long and short term that acts through different ways to achieve the same objective. Other strategies are much subtle and require patience. Will Smith gives an array of recommendation that eventually assist his friends in their romantic life. Such non-verbal cues remains foremost in establishing comic effects and romance within the movie.
For instance, Hitch receives his first client, Albert (Kevin James) who has been having many troubles in initiating romantic relationships. Kevin is in love with a very affluent and powerful cute lady, Allegra, whom he is not able to get. Allegra is hesitant in dating a young, boring and shy accountant because it will be demeaning her ego. Kevin consults Hitch on the way to go about the problem. Kevin uses non-verbal cues by resigning when Allegra gets angry in a board meeting. He is trying to win Allegra by implying that he cares about her emotional turmoil due to wrong advice that she has just received from the investors. Allegra notices how caring Kevin is and gets attracted to him. Kevin’s non-verbal trick seems to have worked perfectly for him in winning the beautiful lady. This is comical as Kevin wins love not on his creativity but advisory of Hitch.
Hitch gets a long mileage due to its aim of spreading the theme of an undemanding romantic way of life to its audience. It utilizes various techniques in attracting its audience to the core theme of remaining romantic and use of subtle non-verbal methods in winning ladies in a romantic relationship (Rodger, 1).
Hitch, however, remains stuck in his romantic life when he fails to use his experience in wooing Sara. Sara seems to be much aware of his old trick and is much ahead in romantic life. She is an experienced, romantic lady who is foresighted and very witty. Hitch cannot use his advice to Albert (Kevin) in succeeding in his quest. The situation is comically and unexpected as Hitch should also employ his experience on love issues in building his individual romance and relationship with Sara.
Conclusively, the hitch is a typical romantic movie that is both entertaining and educating to those in a relationship and employs non-verbal cues that makes it unique and outstanding. (Giannetti, 54).&nbsp.The movie displays comic effects when the perceived counsellor of romance, Hitch fails to win Sara using his individual non-verbal cues tactics. Nonetheless, non-verbal cues helps his friends establish effective romance in their relationships.
References
Top of Form
Giannetti, L. D. (2011).&nbsp.Understanding movies. Boston: Allyn &amp. Bacon.
Rodger, Albert (2015). Review of Hitch. Web. October 16, 2015. Retrieved from http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/hitch-2005
Bottom of Form