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High Job Control

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This research tells that high job control is considered by many to be a practice that empowers the employee and grants him this job satisfaction. It is seen as a practice that protects employees from the detrimental impacts of high work demands. High work demands refer to the complexity of the character of the job, alongside the possibility of the immense pressure an employee feels in getting the job done. Karasek affirms that it is mainly a low job control that leads to high job stress which in turn negatively impacts an employee’s health. He uses his job demands-control model to explain the impact of high and low job control on an individual based on the high or low demands made on him by the job. When it comes to scenarios where the demand is on the higher side while the control is on the lower side, higher levels of stress are felt by the individual leading to deteriorating health conditions. High demand from a job that is accompanied by high job control is termed ‘active’ because it allows the individual to learn and develop as well as use and enhance multiple skills. average levels of strain are felt. Low demand from a job along with high job control is seen as inducing little or no stress for the individual while low demand from the job accompanied by low job control is seen as ‘passive’, as causing average levels of stress and as contributing towards a loss of skills. The important feature to note of this model is the fact that it is fundamentally the lack of job control and not the high demand for the job that is leading to the stress. The model explains how high job control will be used to counter the negative impacts of high job demand, thus acting like a buffer. Karasek Theorell look at some developments that have been made to this model, one of which has been to include support (that is help and guidance from supervisors) as a moderator of work demands.