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Health Care Systems

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The citizens of Spain and France do not have access to MRIs and CT scans, two technological advancements that we Americans take for granted. In Spain, there is no funding for rehabilitation, convalescence care or hospice services, and families are expected to do these duties. And in all these countries, high taxes pay for the meager services rendered, and the citizens often have extremely high co-pays. While all health care systems have their share of problems, the one universal is that their health care costs are rising. Here in America, it is no different. To this end, it is important that the individual take care of his or herself better so that he or she does not tax the health care system with problems that are the result of poor lifestyle choices, such as obesity and smoking. While this is a worthwhile goal, unfortunately, because of the American attitude that individual freedom comes before everything else, it probably is not going to happen. My proposal is that a combination of nanny state techniques, such as banning harmful items and taxing other harmful items, combined with incentives for poor people to get healthy and insurance companies paying for preventative care, might be a partial solution of rising health care costs in America. There are four major kinds of healthcare systems globally. The first is the single-payer system, which is just as it sounds – the government pays for the healthcare of all of its citizens. Hence, the government itself is the single-payer. This is the kind of health-care system that is often, pejoratively, referred to as socialized medicine. The government collects the taxes from the citizenry and pays the health providers directly from this fund.