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Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by Rowling and the Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander

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Still, each of the characters is unique and interesting in his own manner.
First and foremost, we should admit that Harry and Taran both are young and ordinary boys that pretended to live humbly and calmly, but the matter is that their destiny dies not to give them a chance for that. Moreover, they both have a special feeling that does not leave them. It is clear from the context that deep inside these boys understand that they are subsisted for something more than growing with dreadful relatives in Harry’s case or being a pig-keeping assistant as Taran does.
After getting a letter Harry remains to be really happy and open to the adventures that stand in front of him. He cannot believe in this magic world that opens to him, and pleasant emotions overflow him, and a young boy has been ready to be involved in this magic dimension with a lot of miracles and secrets. As for Taran, he considers himself as a boy without personality. he says “I’m certainly not to be anything. I’m not anything even at Caer Dallben” (Lloyd, 10).
We cannot but mentioned that both Harry and Taran are young and inexperienced in heroic proceedings. moreover, their previous lives remain to be rather boring. Still, they are not afraid to go towards dangerous adventures. Such perspectives seem to be curious and joyful for them. One more their similar peculiarity is that boys commit hazardous affairs despite the prohibition of their mentors. For instance, the moment than Harry threads his way to the forbidden section of the library to expand the information about Nicolas Flamel a mysterious warlock has clearly represented this idea (Rowling, 261-270). The other example may be Taran’s crusade to the forest in order to chase Hen Wen in spite of Dallben’s directive has been broken.