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Greenwich Peninsula

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It is important to understand the aspect of cultural heritage in the landscape. At the core of this discussion is the question of how landscapes may be characterized, especially the non-visual features of the landscape.
Interpretations of the landscape may be different from the perspective of different assessors, depending on their knowledge and experience. Therefore, the question of restoration becomes even more difficult to resolve especially when the authentic landscape – against which to measure success and the very legitimacy of the restoration – itself are in a hiatus.
Humanities and the natural sciences appear to be in conflict in the interpretation of landscapes. Cosgrove (2003) compares landscape concepts and points to an approach that could harmonize the two perspectives, ecological and semiotic, closer. Another way is to increase interdisciplinary approaches in landscape studies. The concept of the landscape already implies an interdisciplinary appreciation. its study rarely achieves levels of theoretical integration (Tress et al. 2003).
A group exercise was undertaken to examine Greenwich peninsula regeneration project with this inter-disciplinary approach and to critique the work carried out on this development. The findings of the group have been condensed into a ‘group presentation’ which is enclosed for reference. This essay represents an individual assessment of the Greenwich project as viewed by this writer.

Choice of the Regeneration Project

The group considered a number of regeneration projects currently under implementation in the UK, including the Glasshouses project, Kent coalfields, Spitalfields Market, Limestone House Education, and heritage center. Greenwich Peninsula regeneration project was selected for study, for a host of reasons, the prominent among them being:
The reconstruction and regeneration of an area in the urban milieu was of special attraction to the members, especially because of the large variety and (voice) presence of the resident communities.
The art and cultural background of the area.
The challenge of regeneration in an area that has existed for centuries and has its own and special ‘landscape’. and
The proximity of the area.

Description of the Development work

In 1997, English Partnerships purchased a 300-acre site on the Greenwich peninsula and has invested 225 million to develop the site as a ‘first-millennium’ community promising homes to 28,000 people and deliver over 25,000 jobs. In all a quality of life that meets the expectations and challenges of the 21st century. The Greenwich Peninsula is being developed by Lend Lease and Quintain Estates and Development PLC in the joint venture under the name and style of Meridian Delta Limited, chosen by English Partnerships and the UK government to lead London’s single largest regeneration scheme.
The area has a rich history and has many listed buildings, monuments and places of historical interest.&nbsp.