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Federal Bailout

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With these higher unemployment numbers and the fear amongst those in the banking industry, more and more restrictions were placed upon the opportunity to guarantee new credit to consumers, while the already issued credit lines were at risk of being defaulted on.As a way to intervene in the matter, the federal government would seek to purchase existing debt from major banks, in the hopes of creating more room for new growth. Like anything else the government seeks to do, their plan for the banking industry would have its supporters, along with its vocal naysayers. With a considerable amount at stake going into the Presidential election of 2008, it would become important for both candidates to respond in their own ways, to the legislation that was being proposed by their fellow elected representatives and such legislation, that would be signed into law by the very man that each candidate was hoping to replace come November 2008.At the beginning of debate towards the end of the third quarter in 2008, the initial proposers of such action, would be then-Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and current Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke. This action would see support from both men, the White House, along with both Presidential candidates and the Democratic leaders on Capitol Hill. Considerable opposition to the plan itself, would come from many Republicans, who felt it would be too much government control. In this case, The first proposal for a sweeping bailout of financial institutions came at the height of the panic in mid-September, 2008. Mr. Paulson, with the backing of Mr. Bernanke, asked Congress for $700 billion to use to buy up mortgage-backed securities whose value had dropped sharply or had become impossible to sell, in what he called the Trouble Asset Relief Program, or TARP. As originally outlined, the