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Factors Impacting Spouse of a Chronically Ill Patient

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Factors Impacting Spouse of a Chronically Ill Patient al affiliation option In the study of the experiences of spouses of patients living with MS, Courts et al., (2005) established that chronic illness affect the social relations of the spouse. The effects extend to their financial position, their recreational pattern coupled with their leisure activities. A line of existing literature provides that the central agony to the spouses is the pain of care. However, a section of studies has shown that a chronic illness might present additional independent effects of the life of the partner that could not be retraced to the burden of caregiving. For instance, a spouse might be compelled to set aside personal needs or reorganize private lives in preparation for the unpredictability of the condition of the patient (Kapteinm, et al., 2007). Such unexpected occurrences, as claimed by most spouses of the chronically ill patient may hinder individual achievements and create relationship changes. In support of the change in relationship argument, theory asserts that relationship changes emanate from the increased thoughts about the future on the part of the healthy spouse (Rees, et al., 2001). Most of the healthy spouses, if not encouraged by the ill partner to be free, end up suffering psychologically due to increased stress stemming from the worry of the pain experienced by the sick partner. Further research indicates that most ill partners tend to suffer as they try to cope with their new lifestyles. For instance, a blog shows the quality of chronically ill patients suffers in a myriad of ways (sickmomma, 2013). They have to deal with fear, malaise, and apathy. All these stated aspects have negating impacts on their sexuality and social perception. They often feel powerless due to the pity and constant attention they receive from the public, an aspect that tends to worsen the agony of the pain. In concurrence with these sentiments, Kaptein et al., (2007) claim that the lack of information on the public on how to treat terminally ill patients is a significant challenge. They argue that since their spouses and public perceives them with pity, the chronically ill patients end up viewing themselves as powerless in the society.In conclusion, chronically ill patients though suffer from the ailment. it is evident that their suffering spreads to their healthy spouses. The sudden change in lifestyle leads to unexpected shifts in the relationship as both partners try to adjust to the new developments.ReferencesCourts, N. F., Newton, A. N., amp. McNeal, L. J. (2005). Husbands and wives living with multiple sclerosis. Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 37(1), 20-27.Kaptein, A. A., Scharloo, M., Helder, D. I., Snoei, L., van Kempen, G. M., , J., . . . C. (2007). Quality of life in couples living with huntingtons disease: The role of patients and partners illness perceptions. Quality of Life Research, 16(5), 793-801. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11136-007-9194-4Rees, J., O’Boyle, C., amp. MacDonagh, R. (2001). Quality of life: impact of chronic illness on the partner. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 94(11), 563–566.Sick Momma. (2013, September 1). Retrieved February 28, 2015, from http://sickmomma.blogspot.com/2013/09/what-my-chronic-illness-feels-like.html