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Explain and illustrate the ways in which the theme of Maslowian selfactualisation has come to be central to HRM discourses

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However, under the light of incisive consideration, the matter emerges as a highly intricate interconnection where the motivational factors are seen as more personal and less dependent on extrinsic rewards contrary to popular assumptions. The simplicity of intrinsic vs. extrinsic is disqualified under the assumption that in a HR context, the motivation of employees is inherently intrinsic based on the desired of individuals to develop their professional and by extension personal and deed seated desired for fulfilment. This paper examines the notion of self-actualisation in contemporary HRM where it is widely regarded as an objective in itself outside the rest of the needs in Maslow’s pyramid. Consequently, employees are encouraged to strive for the perfection underpinned in self-actualisation to draw intrinsic motivation from their desire to achieve the unachievable.
People tend to define their worth not as employees but individuals based on their ability to perform in their various tasks (Jim, 2006). Therefore, in HR, self-actualisation is more than just reward as payment or reward for the actual production but rather for the internal effort and self-production, which is always there to motivate the employees with a promise of reward for positivity. The traditional notion of rewards in terms of promotions is transcended by a powerful drive and self-reward that one gives himself/herself after the successful completion of a task. HRM discourse looks at one’s career as a means through which they try to fulfil their potential and they reinforce these efforts by trying to answer questions such as “What is my true self?”, “What can I accomplish?”, “What am I doing with my life?” When one seeks to answer such questions, they are well on their way to interior motivation and reward.
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