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Effects of Teenage Pregnancy on Family Life

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The analysis shall enable the establishment of the connection, thus a foundation for the eradication of the variables researched on.
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), fact sheet number 364, approximately 16 million girls aged between 15 and 19 give birth every year. In addition, one million girls aged fewer than 15 also gives birth every year (Hamilton et al., 2012). Most of these teenagers come from low and middle-income nations.
The World Health Organization also stated complication during pregnancy and childbirth as the second cause of death among teenagers, globally. The research also indicated that almost three million girls aged 15 to 19 undergone unsafe abortions, yearly, and that babies born to these teenage parents face a higher risk of infant deaths (Gibb et al., 2014).
Teenage years are marked by rebellion and disagreement between teenagers and their parents. During this period, they are less likely to trust their parent. Becoming pregnant at this age will probably serve to strain the already complicated relationship. Parents will mostly view the pregnancies as the epitome of the children’s rebellion. The prospect of a fallout with the parents may end causing the teenager to conceal their pregnancies or running away from home (Coleman, 2006).
Teenage girls are likely to hide their pregnancies for the longest time possible because they are afraid to tell their parent. In a majority of cases, teenage girls point at their mother’s potential reactions in explaining their deception. Although the stigma associated with these pregnancies is declining in modern days, most teenage girls are still afraid of the disapproval that their mothers are likely to have. It is worth noting that, some fathers will tend to be bitter and unforgiving. This is true especially when the teenager is still in school (Ferre et. al., 2013).
The stigma and the strain the relationships can be attributed to the fear of rejection and retribution from the parent.