Menu

Dynamics and Essence of Inequality and the Occupy Movement

0 Comment

The articles that are to form the bulk of this discussion are Inequality: Causes and Consequences by Kathryn Neckerman and Florencia Torche, Cultural Capital and School Success: The Impact of Status Culture Participation on the Grades of US High School Students by Paul DiMaggio and Capitalism, Social Institutions of Communism, Economy (Sociological Approach). Globalization. Socialism which features in the translation of Marx Webber’s 1923 General Economic History.
In the first journal article, Neckerman and Torche focus on the US through the use of international standards, in order to sharpen the scope of prevailing domestic trends in the US. In this journal article, Neckerman and Torche contend that economic disparities in America began to soar in the mid-1970s. In this article, Neckerman and Torche research and discuss the patterns and causes that characterize economic inequality in America and the entire globe. These patterns and causes include inequality of earnings, opportunity and wealth. Neckerman and Torche also maintain that there are socio-political consequences of inequality that also underpin this inequality, with education, health, security, political power and social power serving as examples. Neckerman and Torche also train their consideration on the political economy and organization of the labor market and firms, as the very pathways through which social, political and economic inequality are perpetuated.
In the second journal, DiMaggio argues that there is the interplay of many factors which affect the ability to perform well in school. By citing works carried out by ethnographers, ethnomethodologists and other social scientists such as Coleman (1961), Hollingshead (1949) and Cicourel and Kitsuse (1963), DiMaggio shows how American high school education has gradually become unequal.