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Do innovations really make us lazier

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Do innovations really make us lazier? al affiliation: Do innovations really make us lazier? Innovation marks a benchmark for every development activity globally. It spear heads the discovery of different support equipment that immensely contributes to luxurious and comforting life (Swann, 2009). Despite the many benefits and expectations surrounding the process, many questions arise when comparing generations before and after different innovations. For example, why are complicated lifestyle diseases developing in the contemporary world? Additionally, why is education not reaching the required threshold among learning age? An answer to these and several other questions prove innovation as a sole contributor to laziness visible through every microscope of life.Certainly, vehicles and other means of transport are inevitable in the current world. however, their discovery has greatly contributed to laziness. Humans are too much dependent on vehicles and bicycles, they go to sporting events, go to work, shopping and market through vehicles. Because of the changes, innovation has led to lifestyle diseases such as high blood pressure and obesity, hence a significant deterioration of the physical health (Anthony, 2012).In the education sector, students no longer get the full benefit and experience of expediting ignorance. Instead, computers, mobile phones and internet have replaced the role of students in learning. Computers have literally eliminated the ability of learners to spell words correctly and engage teachers in different subjects. Gradually, students are forgetting the role of hard work, but rely on the discretion of innovation to handle all problems. The on-going process seeks appliances that make hair, cook, wash, teach and facilitate security (Koschatzky, Kulicke amp. Zenker, 2001). Therefore, instead of technology making life easy and solving life challenges, it continues to make people lazier.ReferencesAnthony, S. D. (2012). The little black book of innovation: How it works, how to do it. Boston, Mass: Harvard Business Review Press.Koschatzky, K., Kulicke, M., amp. Zenker, A. (2001). Innovation networks: Concepts and challenges in the European perspectives, with 25 figures and 28 tables. New York: Physica-Verlag.Swann, G. M. P. (2009). The economics of innovation: An introduction. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.