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Diversity in the British Mass Media Victory Against Ageism

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As the discussion declaresAndrews and Revoir’s news article heavily uses particular words in which the meanings or implications, intentional or not, are both explicit and implicit. Of the words — and the ideas inherent in them — that are said or written, the most prominent is the term ageism. There are a number of words or lexis in the article that relate or associate to the term of ageism, such as old and several of its variants. By and large, their written text largely discusses the issue of the subject — mainly, Miriam O’Reilly — which primarily focuses on age discrimination that she experienced in her workplace. The notion of ageism is categorized by Butler as a process of systematic stereotyping of and discrimination against old people because they are old.This paper highlights thatthe news article attempts to be objective in presenting the information relevant to the case of O’Reilly. The views between the two opposing parties are generally cited. For instance, the reaction of former BBC controller Jay Hunt — against the accusation thrown to her as a woman who hated women — is clearly, though indirectly, cited. Moreover, the article cites the argument of the BBC officials pertaining to their decision that, categorically, has nothing to do with [O’Reilly’s] age. However, the general thesis of the text evidently shows subjectivity in the way the writers wrote their article….
Former Countryfile presenter O’Reilly is generally addressed by the two news writers as Miss — in fact, she is called in that manner for about eleven times. The term Miss has several connotations, which include the meaning of being a young girl. In the process, this generates a notable paradox: the issue of ageism as against the subject’s state of being young. Moreover, there are a number of words that relate, directly or indirectly, to the term Miss such as rejuvenate, fresh, and young, which essentially appeared two, three, and five times, respectively. On the other hand, the higher officials from the BBC organisation are greatly described in the news article as either senior or boss. First, the term senior connotes, among other connotations, the state of being old or older. In essence, another paradox is subtly created: senior or old officials as against old employees or workers. And second, the term boss implies a master or superior who dominates in giving orders to his subordinate. in the text, such term is mentioned for about two times. On the other hand of the scale, the news article attempts to be objective in presenting the information relevant to the case of O’Reilly. The views between the two opposing parties are generally cited. For instance, the reaction of former BBC controller Jay Hunt — against the accusation thrown to her as a woman who hated women — is clearly, though indirectly, cited. Moreover, the article cites the argument of the BBC officials pertaining to their decision that, categorically, has nothing to do with [O’Reilly’s] age. However, the