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Dissertation Research question (5% of words) Dissertation thesis argument (10% of words) chapter outline (85% of words)

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e controversy arises out of the fact that the UNSC’s authority for sanctions are contained in Article 41 of the UN Charter 1945 and only applies to states.3 In this regard, non-state actors against whom targeted sanctions and blacklisting are directed do not have direct remedies against the UNSC.4 At the same time, the UNSC does not have direct authority over non-state actors who are legitimate sources of threats to international peace and security, and must therefore, rely on states to give effect to its blacklisting and targeted sanctions.5This study is important because the need for targeted sanctions and blacklisting is obviated by the threat that individual non-state actors pose to international peace and security. Arguably, non-state actors, especially terrorist organizations, pose the most serious threat to international peace and security.6 By virtue of Article 24 of the UN Charter, the UNSC is responsible for maintaining international peace and security.7 It has been argued however, that the UNSC faces a crisis in legitimacy because its institutional framework is incompatible with today’s security threats.8 Thus the enforceability and in turn, the legitimacy of UNSC targeted sanctions is the focus of this research. This research will focus on the institutional legitimacy of the UNSC as a whole by focusing on its authority to impose targeted sanctions against non-state actors and its blacklisting mandate relative to non-state actors. This research will be divided into three chapters as outlined below.Chapter 1: This chapter will cover the normative and empirical implications of targeting sanctions and blacklisting. This chapter will focus on three questions necessary for establishing the thesis argument: what are targeted sanctions and blacklisting? Why are they important or necessary? What is the UNSC’s authority for implementing targeted sanctions and blacklisting? Are targeted sanctions and black listing proportionate to the ends that

Dissertation Research question (5% of words) Dissertation thesis argument (10% of words) chapter outline (85% of words)

0 Comment

e controversy arises out of the fact that the UNSC’s authority for sanctions are contained in Article 41 of the UN Charter 1945 and only applies to states.3 In this regard, non-state actors against whom targeted sanctions and blacklisting are directed do not have direct remedies against the UNSC.4 At the same time, the UNSC does not have direct authority over non-state actors who are legitimate sources of threats to international peace and security, and must therefore, rely on states to give effect to its blacklisting and targeted sanctions.5This study is important because the need for targeted sanctions and blacklisting is obviated by the threat that individual non-state actors pose to international peace and security. Arguably, non-state actors, especially terrorist organizations, pose the most serious threat to international peace and security.6 By virtue of Article 24 of the UN Charter, the UNSC is responsible for maintaining international peace and security.7 It has been argued however, that the UNSC faces a crisis in legitimacy because its institutional framework is incompatible with today’s security threats.8 Thus the enforceability and in turn, the legitimacy of UNSC targeted sanctions is the focus of this research. This research will focus on the institutional legitimacy of the UNSC as a whole by focusing on its authority to impose targeted sanctions against non-state actors and its blacklisting mandate relative to non-state actors. This research will be divided into three chapters as outlined below.Chapter 1: This chapter will cover the normative and empirical implications of targeting sanctions and blacklisting. This chapter will focus on three questions necessary for establishing the thesis argument: what are targeted sanctions and blacklisting? Why are they important or necessary? What is the UNSC’s authority for implementing targeted sanctions and blacklisting? Are targeted sanctions and black listing proportionate to the ends that