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Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)

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In 1984, the ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) specification was approved and it was the main motivation behind DSL technology (Six, Online). ISDN was later reused as IDSL (ISDN Digital Subscriber Line). In 1988, ADSL was developed and its patent signed. ADSL (Asymmetric DSL) was of major significance as it allowed users to download data at speeds faster than their speed of upload.In 1984, the ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) specification was approved and it was the main motivation behind DSL technology (Six, Online). ISDN was later reused as IDSL (ISDN Digital Subscriber Line). In 1988, ADSL was developed and its patent signed. ADSL (Asymmetric DSL) was of major significance as it allowed users to download data at speeds faster than their speed of upload. ADSL then began its transition from analog to digital when the demand for increased speeds increased. The technology has already debuted in the market in the form of ISDN. ISDN refers to digital phone connections that have been networked to facilitate the transfer of both voice and data. Through ISDN, more data can be transmitted around the world at much higher speeds. In the transition process, Discrete Multitone was developed by John Cioffi. A DMT ADSL signal is contained into 256 frequency channels. Cioffi’s version of DSL technology was proven to be better than all its competitors hence became an industry standard (Fierce Telecom, Online). In the 1990s, High Bit-Rate DSL (HDSL) was developed and had the same bandwidth in upload and download. It was used more frequently for data transmission between consumers and phone companies. As the DSL technology progressed over the years, it was expanded into a number of technologies (Bagad, 8).