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Democratic and socialist approaches

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Democracy should inevitably lead to ever more local forms of government, and appears to work best when shareholders or stakeholders have some true value or worth accorded to their participation in governance. By this standard, the voting for a President every four years is merely a symbolic action, and in nation states with a huge population such as the United States, it is clear that the individual vote is often lost, viewed as inconsequential, or easily disposed of with by politicians. However, on the local level, the importance of the vote is much more valuable for those who are actively participating in their own governance. The Greek city-state can be seen as a classic example of small-scale governance where the individual voice is truly valued and participation can make a real impact. When power is decentralized to ever smaller and more local organizations of government, democracy works best, as it is under these situations when the people whose lives are actually affected by the decision-making process are actually given the opportunity to discuss and vote on the issues which concern them. This is the principle behind Federalism, and there is significant evidence that the Founding Fathers of America intended or hoped that the Federal government would be an extremely limited organization, lacking the power of income tax initially for example or restricted in its ability to raise debt or standing armies. What has become known as the modern democratic State is in fact little different from what is called an oligarchy?