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Critical Incident Analysis Definition Models and Frameworks

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In doing critical incident analysis, several models have been offered. Models serve as frameworks that will guide the person in analysing the event. It is the paradigm in which the event is made understandable. In other words, model is the lens that people use as they try to understand and make sense of their experiences of the world. As mentioned, the event acts as the precipitator of the analysis. However, the reflection in critical incident is not just a reflection of one’s self per se. It is deemed as reflection of one’s self in the context of one’s work. It is a purposive looking into the event and after the event in order to arrive at the possible things that can be learned from the critical incident. In this regard, the ethos behind undertaking analysis/reflection of the critical incident is to arrive at knowledge that can be gleaned from what had happened. This is made possible because reflection becomes an active, persistent and careful consideration of any belief or supposed form of knowledge in light of the grounds that support it. For this paper, Gibbs Model (1988) has been chosen because it affords a step-by-step approach in doing reflection. It is holistic as encompass all the essential elements in the incident – the critical incident, the person, the things learned and the action. Lastly, the model allows for a continuous re-evaluation of the incident and as such, the model makes room for filtering and re-assessment of the events and the actions undertaken…. In this regard, the ethos behind undertaking analysis/reflection of the critical incident is to arrive at knowledge that can be gleaned from what had happened. This is made possible because reflection becomes an active, persistent and careful consideration of any belief or supposed form of knowledge in light of the grounds that support it and the further consequences to which it leads (Dewey 1933, p. 9). The Choice: Gibb’s Model For this paper, Gibbs Model (1988) has been chosen because it affords a step-by-step approach in doing reflection. It is holistic as encompass all the essential elements in the incident – the critical incident, the person, the things learned and the action. Lastly, the model allows for a continuous re-evaluation of the incident and as such, the model makes room for filtering and re-assessment of the events and the actions undertaken. Description: What Happened? The patient was considered in critical condition because of the patient’s suicidal tendency. As a plan of action, the patient was given a one-on-one CNA to protect the patient from self-harm. However, despite the ‘guarding’, the patient was able to commit suicide. Feelings: What did you feel? I felt fear, anguish and worry all coming together trying to find the answer, how could it happen? It was numbing. I felt and knew that when the tasks is to care for the patient, a care that is developed and built on knowledge, technical skills and ability to perform one’s duty to the utmost of your ability, something like that do not happen. However, why it happened? I felt terrible during that incident because the patient was able to commit suicide when the major care plan was to watch the