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Contemporary Hospitality Management KFC Franchisee Chain

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A franchise hospitality business would have the additional advantages in that it would have reduced research and development costs, more access to training, more access to franchisor’s marketing and advertising campaigns and guaranteed quality control and standards. However, the clinching fact is the customer service and its perception by the customers and retention of a customer segment that is a returning customer segment indulging in substantial repeat purchases.
The KFC has had an evolved history. From its very beginning, it sought perfection in the delivery of its hospitality offerings. This perfection was extended to both finger-licking’ good food and warm, friendly hospitality. These same standards continue today with our goal of excellence for every eating experience in KFC restaurants. At the beginning of KFC, there was nothing save a chicken recipe and a promise. Tthe he recipe was, of course, Harland Sanders’ special blend of eleven herbs and spices cooked in his own secret way. There was no striped red building, no cardboard bucket with the illustrated icon known as the Colonel. There was no fiberglass replica of the diminutive and rotund man standing in the corner in a string tie(Howell, 2000). Sanders’ signed up his first franchise in 1952. KFC changed management several times and was under John Y. Brown and Jack Massey, Heublein and R. J. Reynolds. By the time KFC was acquired by PepsiCo in 1986, it had grown to approximately 6,600 units in 55 countries and territories. Now it is under Tricon. It is important to observe that despite frequent management turnover the KFC continued to have a very detailed and effective franchise agreement which allowed substantial leverages to franchisee units to improve the group working by their innovative methods. This unit would like to attempt the same by taking special initiatives in the use of technology.