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Comparison of Similar Themes Fahrenheit 451 V The Snows of Kilimanjaro

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The novel takes the perspective of identifying various factors that combine and result in banning the books in the future. Analytically, the factors fall into two categories: those that make people rebel against reading books and those that generate low interests in reading the books. Instead of differentiating the two categories, the author presents an argument where the two categories support each other. In the first group, Bradbury includes the fame achieved by forms of entertainment competing for each other. They include televisions and radio. It is the feeling of Bradbury that loud music, the presence of cars that move fast, as well as promotional campaigns build a lifestyle containing stimulation that requires attention that is not available in a modern society. Furthermore, authors publish a huge mass of materials that do not draw reading interest among readers resulting in a society that prefers condensed literature. People shy away from reading the real thing. Factors that make people rebel against reading books constitute the second category. These features fall under envy. The society creates an environment where people who read more than others did appear superior and this creates envy. According to Fahrenheit 541, the objection of groups with special interests and those appearing inferior in reading are the most significant elements resulting in censorship. The author takes precaution against applying the terminology of racial minorities. Bradbury does this by using phrases such as cat lovers and dog lovers as mentioned by Beatty. Generating the exact special-interest categories mentioned in Fahrenheit 451 requires inference and detailed analysis. The author is sensitive to the degree of limiting his freedom of speech. The afterword to Fahrenheit highlights this assertion. He hitherto rejects suggestions made to him to review the treatment of black and female characters in the story.