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Can Obama Make All the Changes that He Promised

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The message of change and hope that his campaign bombed the public with was entirely predicated on the existence of a contrast: they and I, thou and I. Obama’s election is solely attributable to this contrast and the rhetorical emphasis upon that contrast. America experienced this same phenomenon in 1976: the year in which Jimmy Carter became renowned for lofty campaign promises. All that Carter needed was an image: the image of an outsider, somebody fresh, somebody to stand in contrast with the failure of Nixon and his corruption. Like Carter, Obama has made promise under the guise of an outsider, and Americans took him on his word. But Carter met resounding failure, both in his ability to stand up for his country in the face of its enemies and to bring lasting improvement in the country’s economic situation. To the question of whether the current President can keep those promises he has given to get elected, it appears as though he will not be able to.As Jonathan Woon and countless commentators have indicated, there is an aura of optimism floating above Obama’s supporters. Of course, the stars are aligned for the implementation of progressive policies not seen since the legislation of New Deal policies (Woon 329). The Congress is led by Democrats in both houses, ready to submit to a Democratic President for approval. But not only are liberal members of Congress impeding the progress that Obama supporters are seeking, politicians have not changed their ways from the paradigm the new President called politics as usual. The optimism these supporters share is merely symbolic: it is what the President represents as a person, and not as a politician, which is the subject of so much hero worship. Although optimism is good when dealing with life’s problems, in excess it can stand in the way of real progress. Loyalty to people,