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Below Is My Assignment For The Astronomy Lab I Am Taking I Would

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LAB 1 – Observation
Unlike the labs in the text (which will each take a week to complete), this lab will
take several weeks to complete.
Please see the bulletin board or course calendar for the specific date this lab is due.
This lab involves naked eye observations of the darkness of your sky, the Moon
(both its position and phases), the rising or setting positions of the Sun, and the
planets.
Please print the observation sheet (the last page of this lab). You will be drawing on
this sheet to complete this lab exercise. PART 1: The Darkness of Your Night Sky
On a clear night, once your sky is dark, please set your sky clock to the current
date and time. Using your sky clock as a guide, look towards the north and find
both the big and little dippers in your sky (note the little dipper stars are not as
bright as those in the big dipper).
Once you locate the little dipper, find the dimmest star of the group that you can
see (naked eye). This will be an indication of the limiting magnitude of your sky.
Note that a normal eye can see stars down to 6th magnitude under truly a dark sky.
If you live in a major city, the limiting magnitude might very well be much higher
(3 or even 2). Please write down the limiting magnitude of your viewing location
on the provided observation sheet. Use the image below as a guide for determining
this value (note the dippers may be rotated from this view depending on the
date/time of your observation): If your value is 3 or 2, you should feel quite disgusted about the level of lighting in
your area. For more information about the problem of artificial lighting ruining our
ability to enjoy the night sky, please visit the International Dark Sky Society’s
website:
http://www.darksky.org/ PART 2: Moon and Sun Observations
On the blank observation sheet provided, draw (as best as you can) your horizon
(from the east to the south and around to the west). You can determine your
directions by use of a compass or by the star Polaris (in the north). Use the sky
angles sheet to approximate the appropriate height of hills along your horizon. This
image will serve as the basis for all of the following observations you will
complete, so do your best!
A. The Moon
I have posted the dates of the nearest new and full moons (please check the bulletin
board and/or calendar).
Starting a couple of days after the new moon, please go outside, around sunset, at
the same time (every two days or so) for two weeks. Draw the position and phase
of the Moon on your horizon chart. Use the sky angles guide for approximating the
position of the Moon in your sky. Next to each moon image, please write in the
date and time of your observation.
If you are not able to perform these observations at sunset, you will need to
perform them at sunrise. In this instance, begin your observations starting a couple
of days after the full moon. Observe the position and phase of the moon at the
same time (every one or two days) for two weeks. Draw the position and phase of the Moon on your observation sheet. Use the sky angles guide for approximating
the position of the Moon in your sky. Next to each moon image, please write in the
date and time of your observation.
B. The Sun
NEVER LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN (EVEN FOR A MOMENT)!! PERMANENT EYE DAMAGE WILL RESULT.
On the same observation sheet used above, please draw the setting position of the
Sun in the west once every 5 days or so. Label the date and time of your
observation next to each setting position on your chart.
If you are not able to perform these observations at sunset, you will need to
perform them at sunrise. In this instance, begin your observations around the date
of the full moon, and draw the position of the rising Sun in the east once every 5
days or so. Label the date and time of your observation next to each rising position
on your chart. PART 3: The Planets
On a clear night, set your planisphere to the current date and time. Look in the sky
and see if there are any bright stars in the sky not present on your planisphere. If
there are, these are planets! For all you find, plot their position on your observation
sheet. After doing so, please determine what planet each is by looking at your
monthly skymaps, and label them on your observation sheet. Science