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Ational Geographic photographers videos and responses

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The National Geographic Photographers Lynn Johnson: The Heroic Nature of Humanity Lynn Johnson is a photographer concerned about the impacts of hate crimes in America, and to lives of the Long Island anglers and families struggling with AIDS. She narrates that images are so powerful that they can transform people lives and can change history with numerous pictures. An image allows individuals to experience a life from the other side of the camera with a kind of hyperactive- reality (National Geographic 1).Abelardo Morell: Capturing Dreams Abelardo uses age–old photography technique allowing him to cast images he gathers outside world on the walls of rooms, tents, and ground. He has a specially improved camera Obscura helping him to reveal iconic landscapes from the unique perspective. He says his pictures are dreamlike and surreal, but are products of camera in recording, which is like a dream in the physical wake (National Geographic 1).James Balog: Disappearing Glaciers He uses photography to reflect the influence of global warming. His time-lapse cameras have captured evidence of reducing glaciers and changing snow patterns across the world. He maintains that camera gives a language to communicate to the world because the pictorial language can penetrate people’s hearts and minds. He insists that the photographer’s highest calling is to challenge and alter the inherited wisdom (National Geographic 1).Ed Kashi: The Greatest Work You Will Do Professor Kashi describes the highs and the lows of the working as a photojournalist. During the interview, Kashi shares his beliefs that a photographer’s great work comes from the issues he or she genuinely cares. He maintains that a photojournalist has to examine the world and himself because of the challenges and risks involved to accomplish the mission (National Geographic 1).David Gutternfielder: Seeing Life for Yourself He gained access to North Korea where he stresses on seeing life from you because of the different passions possessed by various people. In his viewpoint, the lives of the photographers are not normal life. He expresses interest in the photos of people taking the bus, couple crying at the Pyongyang airport and kids throwing snowballs at each other (National Geographic 1).Brian Skerry: Capturing the Souls of the Sea Brian Skerry has been diving with the camera for over 30 years capturing the unseen world below the water’s surface. The passion of protecting the planet for the future motivated his underwater photography. He says that photography is a discovery process as he spends time with different kinds of sea creatures underwater from the biggest to smallest (National Geographic 1).Marcus Bleasdale: Shock and ChangeHe photographed human rights abuses and conflicts in the Democratic Republic of Congo. He captured the lives of citizens in the war-torn country in Central Africa. His photography has led to policy changes across the world. Photography is a form of communication between the world, and its people say Marcus (National Geographic 1).Joel Sartore: Photo Ark Joel Sartore’s interest is to capture photos of many species as he can to create awareness of many animals in danger of extinction. He travels to zoos around the world to shoot all the 6,000 captive species and has managed to capture 3,500. It is quite fun and they create fancy excuses to why they keep off to their families so much (National Geographic 1).Martin Schoeller: Intimate PortraitureHe has an interest in the distinctive close –up portraits. He maintains that the style of portraiture makes it all about the person and removes unnecessary distractions like clothes environment and background (National Geographic 1).Work CitedNational Geographic. Proof: The Photographers on Photography. 2015. Web. March 3, 2015. http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/proof/proof-trailer